Chris B

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  • #81550
    Chris B
    Participant

    I second what mark says give it another go at sharpening it should out perform and outlast the hardpoint saw
    It has a nice comfortable handle. Might be apple wood
    I reckon by the curve in the top of the blade its a nice piece of old Sheffield steel

    #63233
    Chris B
    Participant

    sbare
    That’s a really neat workbench idea
    I like the planing shelf idea that John has used
    thanks for sharing

    #60319
    Chris B
    Participant

    Sliding dovetails for on the ceiling of course ๐Ÿ˜‰

    Having been into German houses, they put the laminate floors on the ceiling 8-{ (tongue and groove ceilings are popular)therefore I suggest its a German made plane… However I’m prepared to be corrected on this ๐Ÿ˜‰

    #60263
    Chris B
    Participant

    Think you will find the angle allow the cutting of an angled dado
    for something like a sliding shelf to stop the shelf falling out.
    Question is where is the opposite twin?

    #59388
    Chris B
    Participant

    I always like too jump in with both feet so sign me up for the “Big light club” mind you I classify myself as a beginner, however my skin isn’t smooth anymore so I’m not (yet) expecting my wood to be either?
    I like to marvel at the design, the effort and the shear beauty of hand crafted. Being able to roll a coin in a straight line without it wandering doesn’t do it for me. What does is the finished product that stands a chance of being still around and in use 100 years time, when I’m long since gone. If you look at the old woodworker chests that we all love. They certainly weren’t designed as a thing of beauty then, merely practical. So for me the subject is creating something that will last, has good function, has embellishments in that order. Flatness not a high priority beyond a certain level, a couple of years shoved in a loft or shed will wipe that out. Only my opinion. I love the silky smooth feel of a nicely hand planned object, save the feeler gauges for the automobile

    #59386
    Chris B
    Participant

    Crikey! What a potential find.
    Don’t worry about the state of the tools think of all the fun fettling and whittling them tools back into use. I’m so envious of your opportunity.
    If I wasn’t so far away I’d even take your wife off your hands to get the tool chest(Joke)
    Maybe your could sell your wife back to him in exchange for the tools (Another joke)
    Perhaps the best way to negotiate is to give him the bill of the labour restoring them against the sell price then he’ll owe you a 100 bucks
    Either way hope you work out a great deal
    Still envious ๐Ÿ˜‰

    #59114
    Chris B
    Participant

    Lets see if I can describe this simple I took the blade and frog out.
    Noticed that looking from above that the slot in the base was obviously not square? using a combination square I mark the base from below with a sharpie.
    From above laying the blade against the slot I could see that the blade was rising on one side hence the milling and casting of the slot was bad in two planes. Careful filing with a small file (don’t rush a few strokes at a time, stop recheck) remember in the old days the craftsman did most things by eye and a few simple trick example holding it against the light a glint shows the edge and out of true.
    A few minutes trusting myself and a for the bin tool was a good one and some skill learnt and confidence gained just like Paul keeps saying.
    Also a tool rescued ..Magic!

    #59013
    Chris B
    Participant

    I remember reading somewhere I thought it was one of Paul’s Blog
    about sometimes you have to file the edge of the plane behind the blade (casting error) in order for the frog to sit properly. This is what I had to do with my block plane the casting was uneven and a couple of minutes with a flat diamond needle file the job was done. Its scary to take such an action fearing to ruin the whole thing but it was well worth the effort.

    here’s some more info.

    Setting Up and Tuning a Hand Plane

    http://lumberjocks.com/davidmicraig/blog/18799
    http://www.americanwoodworker.com/blogs/tools/archive/2009/08/17/troubleshoot-your-plane.aspx

    #58928
    Chris B
    Participant

    I use a cheap set of diamond miniature files to file the frog bed square and flat on a cheap faithful block plane turned it from a dog to a usable tool! Just like the “master” has said.
    Paul’s done a video on setting up a plane, have you watched that some good tips there

Viewing 9 posts - 1 through 9 (of 9 total)