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  • #668595
    David M
    Participant

    I just recently decided I might like to give the corner shelf a try, but was puzzling over how to hang it. In my case the corners I am considering would have no studs within range of the cabinet unless I built it much larger. There are studs right in the corner itself and then the next one is out beyond the sides of the shelf.

    I have thought of a triangle french cleat system kinda like in the attached picture. Except it would be a right angled triangle coming out from each side of the corner. Anchored to the wall straight up the side of the triangle in the corner. Support for the shelf coming from the top or the triangle. I think it would work but it seems complicated to me.

    So it has been two years since the last post in this topic, did anyone try the straight to drywall anchor approach? If so how did it work out?

    Thanks for any input.

    cleat

    David M

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    #553932
    David M
    Participant

    I too have been wondering about these planes. While I don’t have answers for you I did come across some interesting reviews that may be helpful.

    Have a look here https://www.inthewoodshop.com/ToolReviews/.

    The page lists various reviews including the planes of interest.

    David M

    #550163
    David M
    Participant

    You say that you “need to dimension it down to 3/4″ “, but do you really? For example I have built some small end or side tables. At first, I planned to thickness all to 3/4. But as I proceeded I asked my self why? In the end each apron was processed until the outside looked good, each was a bit different in thickness and none was taken all the way to 3/4. On the outside of each leg I made the reveal the same. The thickness is not visible. When I did the top I again stopped as soon as the pieces were flat and square. Didn’t matter if that was at 1″ or 3/4. In cases where the edge looks to thick then bevel it to lighten the appearance. With another project I built called for a door panel to be 1/2”. The wood I was working with was flat and nice after planning at nearly a full inch. I felt like you and hated the idea of all the work to go to 1/2 inch. After a bit of thought I realized I could go to 7/8, despite what the plan called for and have everything work out nicely.

    I know in some case you may have little choice and really need !/2 or 3/4 inch. But for me many times, for at least parts of a project if not all, I can stop planning when the pieces are flat and work with whatever thickness that is.

    David M

    #366270
    David M
    Participant

    Thanks, I had forgotten about the susceptibility to heat. I have used the paper method once before with a turning but using PVA glue.
    I retried Paul’s splitting method with no luck it is really holding fast. I did get it apart using other means.
    I will experiment a bit more with scrap and see if I can’t get the result Paul describes in his blog quote below.

    “Unlike most all other glues, hide glue is readily split along its glue-line if and when necessary. This characteristic then allows maker-repairer to separate the components by shock-splitting along any glue lines, often using no more than a thin knife tapped with a hammer to split one part from another.”

    David M

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