Dave Ring

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  • #726608
    Dave Ring
    Participant

    I rarely wear an apron but when I do I put on an old blue denim Machinist’s shop apron like the ones I wore daily back in my mechanic days. These were cheap and comfortable with plenty of pockets but they are hard to find these days. The best thing about them was the long straps, which were sewn to the top of the apron and went over the shoulders, passed through grommets at the waist, and tied at the back. These aprons from Harry Epstein are classier examples with the same basic design:

    https://www.harryepstein.com/catalogsearch/result/?q=apron

    For some reason, most aprons sold these days hang off your neck, which gets really uncomfortable after a while, especially if you have stuff in the apron pockets. Horrible design.

    Dave

    #716081
    Dave Ring
    Participant

    It might work OK but I’d keep working on it using coarser sandpaper (80 or 60 grit).

    Dave

    #716040
    Dave Ring
    Participant

    For any of you guys who haven’t discovered it yet, Patrick Leach’s voluminous (and sometimes controversial) tome on Stanley planes (“Patrick’s Blood and Gore”) can be found at:

    supertool.com

    #715702
    Dave Ring
    Participant

    The Stanley No.75 is a cheap, poorly designed, crudely made piece of rubbish that is nearly impossible to use in its original state.

    Having said that, I must admit that I once managed to put one into a condition where it was barely adequate (with a lot of fiddly adjustment) to do some light, undemanding DIY work. Bringing it to this level involved an insane amount of filing and lapping.

    Please do yourself a favor and and spend a few dollars/pounds/euros more for a No.78 or (if you are looking for a small bullnose plane) a Stanley No.90 or one of the many bullnose planes made by Record or Preston.

    Dave

    #713386
    Dave Ring
    Participant

    I received my copy of Joe’s book on Preston shaves from Amazon today and–WOW!–what a great piece of work. This is certain to be THE standard reference to the bewildering array of Preston spoke shaves, sash shaves,quirk routers, stringing routers etc. If any of you guys have even the slightest interest in these tools you should order a copy NOW before the book goes out of print.

    Thanks for the Amazon tip , Joe! You’ve done a great job.

    Dave

    #713250
    Dave Ring
    Participant

    Saw files are expensive and retoothing saws will eat them up quickly.

    In this case, since the teeth are nice and even already, I’d recommend living with the current 12 TPI spacing. Joint the teeth if necessary. File the teeth straight across to eliminate fleam. Set the teeth if they need it. (They probably won’t.) If you need the saw to cut more agressively you can go back and refile the teeth with less rake.

    Then if you aren’t satisfied you can do something more radical: either retoothing or simply buying a saw with more TPI.

    #700748
    Dave Ring
    Participant

    I’ve never heard of anyone using isopropanol as a solvent for shellac. I once spilled a little bit of rubbing alcohol (70% isopropanol) on an old shellacked surface and it did dissolve the finish. I’d be interested to no know how it works for you. I’d recommend experimenting with a small batch on scrap wood before you use this on a real project.

    If this doesn’t work out, you might be able to get ethanol from a camping equipment supplier. It’s used as a fuel for some small backpacking stoves.

    Dave

    #700614
    Dave Ring
    Participant

    For denatured ethanol, you might try asking at a specialist paint store or an artist supply store. (The latter will be pricey.)

    I don’t know what the liquor laws are like in the Netherlands, but in some parts of the USA you can buy drinkable 190 proof (95%) pure grain alcohol in liquor stores. usually under the “Everclear” brand name. Some fussy woodworkers will use this to thin their shellac.

    Dave

    #681733
    Dave Ring
    Participant

    Old wooden smoothers with wide open mouths and heavy tapered irons are as common as dirt, almost as cheap, and will outperform a converted cast iron smoother as a scrub plane.

    A Stanley No.40 is also worth considering, though pricier.

    Actually, most woodworkers get by quite well without using a true scrub plane. For rough preliminary planing an unmodified No.4 or No.5 with a cambered iron is probably all that you need.

    Dave

    #677703
    Dave Ring
    Participant

    I think that Barry is right.

    It looks to me like an exceptionally nice user-made tool.

    Dave

    #669470
    Dave Ring
    Participant

    For flooring, I’d recommend buying cheap sheet vinyl (“linoleum “). Tack it down lightly around the edges so you can replace it easily. (It’s going to get ruined with spilled glue, paint etc.) Then in front of the workbenches lay down rubber interlocking tiles. These will save wear and tear on both your feet and dropped tools.

    For lighting, I’d hang a 3 or 4 foot LED shoplight ($15-$20 each) over each bench. An articulated arm magnifying lamp such as this one….:

    https://www.walmart.com/ip/V-LIGHT-Full-Spectrum-Natural-Daylight-Effect-Magnifier-Task-Lamp-with-3-Diopter-Glass-Lens-and-Desktop-Base-Black-Finish/384458897

    ….can be very handy, especially when sharpening saws.

    Dave

    #666096
    Dave Ring
    Participant

    The Sandusky Tool Co. of Sandusky Ohio, one of America’s most prolific makers, was in business between 1869 and 1925 when their factory was destroyed by a tornado. Here in SE Michigan, Sandusky planes found in the wild outnumber all other brands of wooden planes by far. They made good planes.

    The width of the cut should be stamped at the rear of the plane.

    Dave

    #665931
    Dave Ring
    Participant

    As Brian has said, it’s a dado plane and an exceptionally nice one at that.

    The tips of the nicker iron need to be reshaped and sharpened. They should end in a semicircular shape with a bevel filed around the inner faces.

    Dave

    #664157
    Dave Ring
    Participant

    Old wooden planes (British and American ones, anyway) normally had tapered irons, very thick at the bevel end and getting thinner toward the opposite end. If your iron is uniformly thin, like those in most cast iron planes, its a replacement.

    Dave

    Dave

    #660327
    Dave Ring
    Participant

    Here you go:

    https://www.leevalley.com/en-ca/shop/tools/hand-tools/marking-and-measuring/rules/67477-starrett-hook-rules

    BTW Lee Valley is currently offering free shipping with no minimum order.

    Dave

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 305 total)