George Scales

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Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 19 total)
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  • #729586
    George Scales
    Participant

    Let the slabs rest in your shop for a few weeks. You can always rip them into narrower pieces and glue them back together to stabilize them. A good heavy oak work bench is a treasure.

    #729585
    George Scales
    Participant

    I was a pastor for 47 years. About 20 years ago we built a new church and had to dismantle the old one (built in 1762). The pews in the old one were made of heart pine. Though the pews were made by the same pattern, the quality of workmanship varied. I suspect that a plan was determined and families made their own pew. The seat was eleven feet long, fifteen inches wide and two inches thick. The back were made of two rails that were about six inches wide and the same thickness as the seat. Families in the church took many of the pews home, but more than fifteen had come apart. I took those pieces home to my own shop. Over the next several years I made three trestle dining tables and four cupboards (pie safes in the Southern US) and at least four wall clocks .Frequently, on Craigs list, people want to give away free of charge, old pianos. These are wonderful source of mahogany, some times ebony, and genuine pieces of ivory that can become accents is projects. You can sell the iron it the piano for scrap and the maple sound board can make cutting board, jewelry boxes and other small projects.

    Old pews are a great source of seasoned wood.

    #729583
    George Scales
    Participant

    I have a 14″ Delta that I bought new 30 years ago. I struggled with drift for years. Then I learned to square the table to the blade. I have aftermarket (Carter) guides. I wanted to be able to rip a board straight. I usually leave my line and plane it afterwards. For years I did re-sawing on the table saw. It worked but it is tedious and waste a lot of wood and can be dangerous. Your band saw will come for the factory under powered. That is why it stalls when re-sawing and sometimes on sharpe curves. I upped the horsepower on my saw just a year ago and kick myself for not having done it years ago. The speed is the same, but now it doesn’t stall on a re-saw. Also, when I install a new blade, I take a small whet stone and rub it and forth on the back side of the blade with the saw running. This dresses the blade’s back edges for a smother cut. I also wax my table once a week.

    #729580
    George Scales
    Participant

    Paul’s video on the #78 is adequate for me. I have on occasion made a wooden fence that is longer and wider than the factory fence. I set my iron flush to the sole and use the lever for all adjustments. The light hand approach while planing works well for me. And, as Paul would remind us, your iron should be as you can get it. And I find Paul is correct to remind us to start the far end of the rabbet and work toward the back. Fifteen minutes of practice on scraps before you use your project piece is always a good idea. If you place your off hand properly you can insure that the fence square to the edge, it can also hold the plane flat to the surface and insure that you are perpendicular . It is truly a matter of practice and muscle memory. Poplar and pine scraps a great test pieces.

    #725599
    George Scales
    Participant

    I have used super glue for suck things. It is thin and flows in the openings quite well……….then waxed paper from the kitchen and a batten to keep it flat. Let it dry thoroughly and clean it up with a card scraper .

    #725028
    George Scales
    Participant

    Watch Paul’s video on cutting boards. On one of them he puts on a breadboard edge. I believe he does the same on a dining table video.

    #722232
    George Scales
    Participant

    Hello,
    I have made two of these corner cupboards. The first I screwed to the wall and the second I used heavy commercial hangers (like over sized picture hangers) that i got from a mirror and glass company. They have bails at the top and are screwed to the back of the cupboard. I also use these hangers to hang wall clocks

    #707102
    George Scales
    Participant

    Take a looks at Paul’s wooden bench. He used oak. I have made two of these and sold them. The seats are sculpted and fairly easy to do. People really like them

    #707101
    George Scales
    Participant

    I am a retired pastor. We once had a similar situation. I ended up with eleven heart pine pews eleven feet long. I made threee kitchen cupboards and two 7 foot dining tables and benches out of them. They sold well and I made a bit

    #707100
    George Scales
    Participant

    You can make a sled for a table saw and cut into small squares and glue them up into a great end grain cutting board. I know a studio furniture maker in North Carolina who makes only about six pieces of bespoke furniture a year. His wife developed a series of earrings made of polished pieces. Combined, her income exceeds his in a year. It makes his furniture making business more than twice as profitable. personally I use my hard wood scraps for cutting boards, inlays, and walking canes.

    #702433
    George Scales
    Participant

    I get a four pack at Lowe’s. I use the rubber ones so they don’t slip of slick surfaces. Crutch tips or cair tips……both come in rubber.

    #702432
    George Scales
    Participant

    I attend a church of mostly elderly people ( I am one myself). The standard joke there is that you have to have a knee or hip replacement to be a full fledged member. I started making canes and now make about three a month and give them to the folks that have leg joint issues. They love them and it gives woodworking yet another purpose.

    #700926
    George Scales
    Participant

    You are correct about the dust collection. My pockets are designed for three items. A six inch try square, a six foot measuring tape and my marking knife. The pencil pockets are a bit higher than those three. Dust can still be a problem, but I have less trouble with that since I moved to a hand tool only method. I also sneeze less!

    #700921
    George Scales
    Participant

    Mine is denim with three pockets and two pencil pockets. The string is threaded through a channel sewn into the top edge and going down the sides. This allows it to be raised or lowered in the front. Then you just tie the string in the back. You could make the string long enough to go all the way round and bring it back to the front to be tied . Easier to tie it that way! My bride made mine as well! If you don’t have a bride, its a diy.

    #700917
    George Scales
    Participant

    I always set my iron as close to flush with the sole of the plane as I can with the slots of the back of the blade. move the adjuster so that you have plenty of room to advance the iron to the desired depth. I have a block plane with the same type of slots and set it the same way. Works for me!

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 19 total)