jcat

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Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 18 total)
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  • #554974
    jcat
    Participant

    Rowdy,
    Ahhhhh, “INDISPENSABLE”, I do use an electric trim router from time to time which clamping to the bench top helps quite a bit but indispensable?? Nah, there are always other ways of doing things and work a rounds. If that’s the reason for not to having aprons, I would say more lateral thinking please, build your aprons and enjoy them
    Cheers

    #554961
    jcat
    Participant

    Sorry if I haven’t understood the question, I thought you wanted ideas for having an apron and a method of clamping to the front, the “what for” was your department.
    In my case I use my bench for everything, be it assembly, woodwork, home maintenance, mower repairs etc, metalwork and welding (with a sheet metal cover) and you will also note my bench is a flat top, wells don’t work for me. Also I don’t use dogs yet, I want too but I don’t want to drill holes in my pretty bench!! I use those rails for clamping all sorts of things including planing wide boards and sheet materials too. It gives me options and versatility considering my type of bench (no well, etc) and what tools and equipment I have available.
    There is never only one way of doing things plus I enjoy trialing and experimenting, hence the tweaked Paul Sellers workbench,( so far so good;-) )
    Cheers

    #554945
    jcat
    Participant

    I’m not up to speed with all the bench styles you mention so i hope I’ve understood your question Rowdy Whaleback but when I made my tweeked version of Pauls bench I laminated a rail (75x45mm timber) on the front and back aprons so I could clamp onto these. If I work out how to attach a photo I’ll post one. Admittedly Paul has said somewhere that he never felt the need for such.
    Cheers Jcat

    20180303_153343

    #493499
    jcat
    Participant

    Thanks @eckyh for the comment, Yeah I can report that the bench is solid as a rock, equal to Pauls solid demonstration in the workbench videos. I’m very happy, we’ll see how it goes over time.
    Cheers and luck to all
    jcat

    #489208
    jcat
    Participant

    My version of a Paul Sellers workbench, made from Radiata Pine (standard construction timber here in Oz). As you can see the legs are at a 10 degree angle. Why you ask, cause I like the look and that’s about the only reason. There are no wedges as I’m thinking between the preset angle of the legs, gravity and mass I wont need them, however I did leave room to add them if my theory is rubbish, lol.
    The top is 6’x3′ or 1800 x 900mm, mainly because I do everything on my bench including metal work (with a cover now) so one size has to do all and of coarse no well. I use a carrying tote for many of my tools so I just plonk it on the bench (make use of the depth.) The top is still two piece like Pauls, I just put the well flush with the top and glued the apron to the well piece.
    Great project, flattening laminations was fun? a bit like chewing your own leg off 😉

    Cheers

    #310786
    jcat
    Participant

    Thanks Dieter, No no, not end grain to end grain, sorry if my expression is confusing. I meant side edge to side edge to make up the width of the table top.
    Thanks for taking the time though
    Cheers jcat

    #310520
    jcat
    Participant

    Nice work rlennon, I, like you had to make my own because of the cost. I also bought a veritas blade (I made one out of a allen key/wrench but my honning was always rubbish!! 😉 ). Mine is made from Australian red gum, a very hard, very dense timber that will take a thread if you don’t ask too much of it. I made it a little long because I mostly use it for cleanning up tenons etc and larger reccesses so the extra lenght helps keep things paralle. The nut I used for the hight adjuster is a spare from a spoke shave that I broke some time ago. As you can see I went for function over form but it works well for my purposes.
    Cheers jcat

    #310471
    jcat
    Participant

    I second rodrats recommendation, I’m in OZ and I bought my double square from Taylortool in the USA, I’m one happy cat
    Cheers

    #310455
    jcat
    Participant

    My 4″ precison double square, it’s soooooooo good when marking joints on smaller pieces (handling etc) and more precise than a engineering square over time.
    Cheers

    • This reply was modified 5 years, 3 months ago by jcat.
    #308533
    jcat
    Participant

    Hello Debra,
    I have no idea what JB weld is (I’m from Oz) but as a former metal worker it’s a simple repair with an arc welder (stick welder). Grind along the crack a little to hollow it out a bit then weld with a tool steel electrode or if unavailiable a stainless steel electrode. Don’t be tempted to grind the weld flat as thats where the strengh is. As the crack is where the tang and blade meet there is no need for any heat treatment as the heat won’t travel far enough to cause much grief, especialy if the operator just uses a series of tacks.
    Cheers jcat

    #143839
    jcat
    Participant

    I bought a glass shelf from a big box hardware store (6″x 24″x 3/8″)
    for about $10 here in Oz. I clamp the wet/dry paper with two small spring clamps (like a cloths peg, I don’t know their proper name) and I squirt the glass with some water before putting on the paper. I find this holds the paper quite well.
    Cheers

    #143066
    jcat
    Participant

    Hi Zac, The clamps I can’t find in Oz either but Timbercon has the diamond plates for $109 each however they don’t seem to have the 250 grit. I bought the double sided 1200/400 grit the 400 grit is coarser than pauls recommend 600 grit, it was a compromise to cut cost and it works well and you can live without the 250 grit but 250 grit is nice when you need to do heavy work (changing angles or a new profile)
    Cheers
    Julian

    #143016
    jcat
    Participant

    Yep, I adjusted the set on the band saw blade as per Pauls instruction/video between two hammers, worked well for me.
    I haven’t had to sharpen my Veritas yet but with 20tpi I’m not looking foward to it but I have got a clip on magnifing glass ordered on ebay, maybe that will help.
    Cheers

    #143013
    jcat
    Participant

    I have a veritas 20tpi dovetail saw which I use of most of my work however sometimes I need something a little bigger. I made a frame saw 14″ at the blade hole centers using Pauls recommended 14tpi metal cutting bandsaw blade and I can tell I’ll never buy a tenon saw again, it’s terrific. It does take a little getting used to comming from a back saw but not alot. I also modified mine to be a turning saw, well worth while IMO.
    Cheers

    #142520
    jcat
    Participant

    No worries Steve, Glad it worked for you
    Cheers jcat

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 18 total)