markdennehy

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  • #655746
    markdennehy
    Participant

    Thank you! It’s definitely not climate controlled, but the soundproofing foam on the roof and door and the airgap between the OSB lining and the outer cladding do help somewhat. A small oil-filled rad duing the worst of winter is handy as well, but yeah, rust is something that crops up a fair amount. Scotchbrite, wax on the lathe and bandsaw beds, and I keep a candle stub in my pocket and every time I use a handplane the sole gets some wax. That helps, but nothing really ever stops it.

    #309769
    markdennehy
    Participant

    Thank you! The walnut pieces all had had four coats of shellac, sanded back after the second coat as per Paul’s description here; then the cot was assembled and the entire thing had three coats of Osmo thin wood wax. The drawer though just had three coats of shellac over both the walnut and the poplar sides. The shellac was made up as a two-pound cut — only it was a 24 gram cut because I’m a bit metric 😀
    metric cuts for shellac

    So 24g of button shellac from liberon and 80g of isopropyl alcohol (because kitchen digital scales and the tare button make this a lot easier to measure out).

    #309642
    markdennehy
    Participant

    I wouldn’t make it so darn complicated 😀
    Or so big – the thing is just the wrong side of “this is too big to build in this shed” (I work in an 8’x6′ shed in the garden).

    And I stole the steambending-in-a-bag idea from here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=50uXPPt8-VI

    More details on that here : http://www.stochasticgeometry.ie/2016/12/03/properly-bent/

    #309638
    markdennehy
    Participant

    Mortice and tenon joints with curved tenon shoulders (and straight tenons at a tangent to the curve) Matt. And then lots of fettling to match the curves. The match isn’t perfect though.

    Cutting mortices

    Like that, only on the inside of the curved piece. It was fiddly, but it helped that the mortices are only three-sixteenths wide.

    Slats fitted

    Unfortunately, final assembly introduced some twist into the piece and the fit wasn’t as perfect as that in the end (there’s a good 2mm of gap in the worst spot).

    #140511
    markdennehy
    Participant

    BTW, I was kindof impressed with the veritas end vice for surviving the wallop the way it did. I mean, “Must survive having 500lb of bench and idiot dropped on the handle by the idiot” can’t have been on the design specs after all, and yet it managed it. So I wrote off to Veritas just to say “nicely done lads, that’s a nice bit of kit”. Because that sort of thing ought to happen to engineers a bit more often.

    They’re posting – unasked for and free of charge – a replacement screw shaft for the vice, so it’d look its best.

    I mean, I know, cheap marketing and so on, but still. Deserves a bit of a thumbs-up I thought. Can’t see Bosch doing that because I dropped a drill and the casing survived the impact. And it’s kindof — not to be too much of a leftie pinko commie hippie about it — but it’s kindof nice when a manufacturer does that sort of thing, especially these days.

    So there it is. A nice little postscript to the build.

    #140504
    markdennehy
    Participant

    I’ve just been lurking there for a while Matt. I like some of the projects they’ve put up there; that campaign furniture secretary’s desk for example, that was something lovely to see. To the point of making me think of building one. But then, I quite like Christopher Schwartz’s take on things and I like his books so far, so I might be an outlier. The US side of things is somewhat dominated by the table saws most of the time, but they do seem to have carved out a small niche here and there for hand tool stuff; I like those niches in general but Underhill’s a little too folksy for my tastes even when I’m enjoying his stuff (I guess I’m too young to enjoy it fully); Fidgen is a bit too… hipster? (I’m too old to enjoy that fully :D) And Schwartz lands right in the middle, while Klausz is just what everyone thinks their grandad should be like 😀

    • This reply was modified 5 years, 2 months ago by markdennehy.
    #140358
    markdennehy
    Participant

    And as tough as anything. I built the bench in the back yard so I’d have room, and then when it was done went to pick it up to move it to the shed where it’ll live. So I clambered under the bench, got my shoulders to the underside of the benchtop and held the stretchers to steady it, made sure I had the face vice out in front of me so most of the weight was in front of me and then I stood up.

    At that point I learned that (a) the wood was heavier than the metal, (b) when you’re inside a 200+lb bench and it’s falling backwards, you can forget trying to stop it and just focus on keeping your arms and legs inside the vehicle at all times to avoid awkward snapping noises, and (c) the best part of 500lb of wood, metal and me hitting the ground after about a 4-5 foot run-up makes for a very loud noise indeed, especially if you’re inside it at the time.

    And that entire impact landed square on the veritas end vice handle.

    The vice is fine. The screw turns smooth, the wagon tracks straight, the frame is unblemished. The aluminium handle is a bit scuffed, but if you dropped 500lb on my head I’d be scuffed too. And the last inch of the main shaft is now bent 10-15 degrees from true, but the screw is unaffected.

    Dinged handle

    Honestly, I’m pretty impressed by this thing.

    • This reply was modified 5 years, 2 months ago by markdennehy.
    • This reply was modified 5 years, 2 months ago by markdennehy.
    #140356
    markdennehy
    Participant

    Yours is a damn sight better looking than mine! 😀
    I suppose I shouldn’t be surprised others built theirs the same way, but that really is a surprisingly similar bench. Honestly never saw it before today either.

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