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  • #661214
    Mike Goodwin
    Participant

    This can be done with glue alone as this is a long grain to grain conection, which is very strong. This will work fine with plywood casings as half your plys are long grain. Just glue and clamp. I have seen dowels used, but, that mainly helps with alignment. By far the most common method is glue and nail. The nails are used to avoid clamping and are hidden with putty..

    #659753
    Mike Goodwin
    Participant

    The 50 came with a screw to hold the smallest blades ( J in the attached ). You will need that. you can find Stanleys instructions here: http://www.hansbrunnertools.com/Stanley%20by%20numbers/Stanley%2050.htm

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    #658944
    Mike Goodwin
    Participant

    It looks like a flat sawn piece and the full width of the log. You have several cathedrals, lots of reversing grain, particularly down the center of the board. You’ve tried a light set with a very sharp blade. Sometime a board just can’t be planed. Try a card scraper and/or a cabinet scraper, that should do the trick.

    #658631
    Mike Goodwin
    Participant

    1. I hook my shop vac up to the dust extraction port. It seems to pull most of the fine dust. Then clean up with a broom and the vac. My shop is in my garage, so I can be a little more dust tolerant. 2. The unit was heavy, but, manageable solo. Again this went into a garage. Probably should be a two man operation getting one into a basement. 3. I get about the same level of accuracy as I get with hand sawing, with about the same amount of planeing needed for clean up. For me the bandsaw has been more about saving labor than anything else.

    #658389
    Mike Goodwin
    Participant

    I have 14″ very basic (all I could afford at the time) unit. Not a game changer, but, useful when dealing with larger projects that require curves or aches. The labor saving involved with re-sawing has also been helpful, although i’m limited to 6″. I feel that the $400 I spent wasn’t wasted, but, may have been better served to have saved up for a unit with better re-saw capacity. Noise and dust haven’t been an issue, both are fairly minimal with a band saw as compared with other shop machines.

    #633774
    Mike Goodwin
    Participant

    Kitchen type base cabinets would work fine. I’ve been in a number of shops that recycled old kitchen cabinets from kitchen remodels and used them as shop cabinets. I’ve also set up 2 large maintenance shops using such cabinets; one plywood bases and one laminated particle board. Both used “formica” veneered kitchen counter tops. Both held up fine under the abuse of multiple, none to gentle, users, through neither stayed pretty for long.

    4′ bases will be easier to make and install than 8′. When combined they will also be sturdier.

    With the above said, I recently set up a third workshop in which I wanted the counter tops to function fully as secondary workbench tops. In this case I used simple 2 x 4
    laminated H frame construction (3 1/2′ x 3″ legs with 1 1/2″ x 3 1/2″ cross members) to make a framework on which to attach a 3″ thick solid top (in this case made from solid core commercial doors). The H frames are attached directly to the wall studs. A ledger board is screwed into the wall to support the back of the counter top. The frames are spaced to accept free standing cabinets that can be slipped in between the framework. The cabinets themselves bear no load.

    This has worked well and is serving as the prototype for counters that I am planing on installing in my home shop. The only major change will be to use laminated boards (or plywood, like Mr. Sellers current bench) instead of door slabs for the counter top..

    Hope this helps.

    #601221
    Mike Goodwin
    Participant

    Glue alone should not be to weak, as it is typically a long grain to long grain connection, which is very strong.

    #555419
    Mike Goodwin
    Participant

    Looks great. I like how you handled the plane stop. I’m currently building a bench for work and I may end up “borrowing” the concept.

    #555265
    Mike Goodwin
    Participant

    I’m afraid your right, you have essentially rediscovered the wheel. This method was common enough that the old saw makers, like Disston and Atkins, made handles to accommodate the grip. Google Disston D8 thumbhole saw.

    #555251
    Mike Goodwin
    Participant

    Using Mr. Seller’s methods, you shouldn’t have any issues with the drawers handling the utensil load, as long as you pay close attention to your tolerances. Cans and bottles could be more problematic depending on drawer size and load.

    Wood on wood runs smoothly, particularly with a little wax on the contact surfaces, but, won’t match steel and ball bearing runners. It really depends on what you consider to be tolerably smooth.

    I would note that steel and ball bearing (or wheel) runners are prone to failure over time. 20 years is a good general lifespan estimate. Wood can last hundreds of years.

    #554255
    Mike Goodwin
    Participant

    The only significant issue would be that you will end up with “soft” and “hard” strips on your surface. This could lead, over time, to the surface becoming uneven. The spruce will compress and dent more readily than the cherry and your mystery wood.

    You could, in theory, use that to your advantage by concentrating your hardwood at the front of the bench where it will receive the most wear. If your building an English style bench, like the one Mr. Sellers promotes, you could laminate them together for the apron or, better yet, the tool well.

    #552408
    Mike Goodwin
    Participant

    The extra width, and length, can be useful when smoothing wider/longer pieces, like table tops. That said, I picked up my 4 1/2 primarily for the extra weight. As a purely personal preference, I prefer a heavier plane in general, (I use a 6 frequently, not just as a fore plane but as my primary shooting plan and as a joiner for smaller stock). I feel the extra weight aids me in working the wood with smoother, more flowing passes. I also like the larger ergonomic dimensions of the 4 1/2 over the 4, despite not being a particularly big guy.

    Despite my preferences if I could only have one or the other it would be the 4. They cost less, new or used, are mush easier to find on the used market and they are simply more versatile.

Viewing 12 posts - 1 through 12 (of 12 total)