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Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 16 total)
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  • #664680
    Rafael Herrera
    Participant

    Is it light weight? Did you ever find out?

    From the picture IMG_20200112_125142.jpg it looks to me like a mahogany or mahogany-like wood. It appears to have a reversing grain pattern that I’ve seen in some mahoganies.

    #664645
    Rafael Herrera
    Participant

    The handle well was never meant to be seen again, so it didn’t need to look neat. Research the use of hide glue, it’s very interesting, then attempt to re-attach the handle if you feel inclined to use it.

    #664639
    Rafael Herrera
    Participant

    Sagi,

    If your board is not flat, then you may experience the effect of not cutting until you extend the blade too much.

    Also, the bevel of the blade should be around 25 – 30 degrees. If the bevel is too steep, then the cutting edge may not engage the wood and the plane is riding on the bevel belly over the wood.

    #662499
    Rafael Herrera
    Participant

    Here’s another box I made. I got the stone from a Canadian dealer, he claims it’s Novaculite, of the same type as Arkansas stones.

    I’ve two reason why I didn’t add end grain blocks, one the dealer chanfered the corners of the stone so a block would not mate flush with the stone, and second the wooden blocks I used to make the box weren’t long enough. The stone is wider on one end than the other, but I managed to get a good fit, the lid goes only one way.

    It’s a hard stone and I use it sometimes to refine an edge, I don’t get remarkable results, so I don’t use it very often.

    #662497
    Rafael Herrera
    Participant

    I lapped the stone, still in the box, with silicon carbide grit on a piece of glass a few days ago. It abraded the blocks too, so it’s all very even. When I sharpen I move the edges diagonal to the stone/block gap, so they don’t catch. If the stone has sharp edges at the ends, one can get a nice fit. The stone and blocks are press fitted in the box, if I take it out they get misaligned, so I leave it there permanently.

    You may be a little more aggressive when chopping, but the important thing is to have a tight fit so the stone doesn’t sit loose in the box. You could also use a Forstner bit to remove material faster. For the lid, you may not like the holes left by the center point, so you will have to use your router to remove the last 1/8″. Take your time, a nicely fitted box is ice to have.

    #662199
    Rafael Herrera
    Participant

    Benoît, after a few months of use I’ve settled on using it for my routine sharpening tasks. I sharpen by hand. It is quick and complemented by a strop and green compound I obtain a very sharp edge. All my chisels and irons are made of vintage cast steel or O1 steel, except one block plane. The block plane uses an A2 blade and I sharpen it on the Washita stone w/o great difficulty.

    Kjord, thank you, I’m happy with the box and the stone so far. Which stones do you use?

    I’ve been considering getting a black Arkansas for some time, but I don’t think I really need it at this point. I’ve a stone similar to an Arkansas that I got from a dealer in Canada, it’s harder than the Washita, it can refine the edge of my tools a bit but I don’t feel that it makes a big difference, after a few passes the extra sharpness wears out and the edge settles. I haven’t used Kerosene since I was a boy at my father’s workshop. I’ve been using mineral oil and neatsfoot oil on my stones. I haven’t made up my mind about which one I prefer yet, if I’m refreshing an edge, it only takes half a minute to sharpen on the Washita.

    I’m waiting in the mail for a Washita stone that appears to be of the Lily White or No. 1 grade. It’s not labeled, I’m just taking a gamble, but it was a good size and not very expensive. I’ll make a box for it too. I’ll post here how it turns out.

    Rafael

    #645970
    Rafael Herrera
    Participant

    If you go the vintage blades route, make sure there are no rust pits on the back of the blades.

    #645897
    Rafael Herrera
    Participant

    You can find new old stock blades for this plane on Ebay.

    #645894
    Rafael Herrera
    Participant

    I’ve read that you can just store the brushes in a sealed container, soak it in alcohol or shellac mix for a few minutes before use and the dry shellac will dissolve. Note that Paul is using a Hake brush, not as thick as the ones in your picture. I haven’t tried this, so I don’t know how well it works.

    #645832
    Rafael Herrera
    Participant

    Benoît, I finished it with shellac, the oil wipes off easily from it. The stone, I believe, is a Washita stone. I purchased it from a seller in the UK, so it has made it back to the US after who knows how long. I use it to resharpen my blades as it does it really quickly and it’s hard enough not to dish out as fast as water stones do.

    Thank you Stu, the wood, I was told, came from a renovation job at a local university, it’s most likely sapele.

    #644813
    Rafael Herrera
    Participant

    Hello Stu, I finished the box a few days ago. What you deduced is correct, the blocks help prevent rolling the tool over the edge when sharpening. I think the blocks are most useful when sharpening by hand since the blade is held at an angle, so you won’t hit the gap between stone and block. It let’s you use the whole surface of the stone, so I presume it can be used with diamond plates as well. I carved a 1/2″ mortice for the stone and blocks, I think you may need to glue them for a 1/4″ thick diamond plate.
    Cheers,
    Rafael

    #614700
    Rafael Herrera
    Participant

    Isn’t a meditation stool top supposed to be at an angle?

    I made this foldable one several years ago when I was into meditation. Sitting either cross legged or on the stool wasn’t comfortable 😉

    #614673
    Rafael Herrera
    Participant

    I used clamps to open the gap just a tad. There was another crack at the very bottom of the handle, as you can see in the picture above. I diluted the wood glue with some water and was able to get it to penetrate the gaps.

    It worked pretty well, it feels pretty solid.

    Thank you for the advise.

    Rafael

    #612362
    Rafael Herrera
    Participant

    I’m glad I haven’t tackled this yet, the idea of using clamps to open the gap would let me use both hands to squeeze the glue in.
    I don’t really want to break it all the way, since that would cause the bottom part of the handle to break too.

    #611279
    Rafael Herrera
    Participant

    Thank you for the advise. I’ll give the wood glue a try tonight.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 16 total)