raze599

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  • #141574
    raze599
    Participant

    I have found that quite a few of these small gaps don’t go very deep and can be planed out once the piece has been glued together.

    #141569
    raze599
    Participant

    It is very time consuming unless you are very, very experienced.

    Stock preparation indeed does take up a lot of time. It is not a simple feat by any means to prepare stock correctly by hand.

    I’ve found that deciding on a reference face and edge should be the first thing you should do. Concentrate on getting these faces properly flat and square. The other two are less critical so you can spend less time on those. Also, know to what level your stock needs to be flat. Not all work needs to be 100% flat. Some pieces do need to be as flat as possible. Some pieces however do not for their intended application.

    #141385
    raze599
    Participant

    It does look as though a previous owner modified it to be that shape.

    The only problem I can think of that this may cause is if you want to use this plane in a tight corner such as the end of a stopped housing/dado. One corner will cut and the other will not as the edge will not reach the corner.

    #140806
    raze599
    Participant

    I do the same as kevin, but sometimes I also put some nails along the side of the piece so I have an extra side to push up against without the board moving.

    #140780
    raze599
    Participant

    Thanks guys. As of now the most promising option is to buy a cheap plane to dismantle. I’ll see how it goes. Thanks again for your replies.

    #140760
    raze599
    Participant

    Hi Richard.

    I don’t have an answer for your first question, but for the second question you want to choose a TPI to correspond with how you will use your coping saw. I believe the regular TPI for cutting wood is 16 and for metal it can be considerably higher. Higher TPI means a smoother finish but a slower cut.

    #140566
    raze599
    Participant

    I just made some cabinet doors with glass in them. It was just like you would make a regular door with grooves in all four pieces which are then connected with mortises and tenons. I put a pane of 6mm glass in there instead of plywood. Worked perfectly.

    #140362
    raze599
    Participant

    Mr Sellers mentioned somewhere that it would be I think two episodes on sawhorses and then a new series will begin on building a rocking chair.

    #140157
    raze599
    Participant

    It would indeed make it quicker but I don’t think 5 days is anywhere near correct. I’ll be mixing some up in a few weeks too so I’ll see how that goes

    #140140
    raze599
    Participant

    I think even having a vice on each end would be ok. I cant think of a reason where it is essential as a right handed person to have bench space to any particular side of the vice. Not that I’ve come across anyway. Paul I think mentioned that for right handed people the reason the vice is usually on the left is so that they can easily reach for their tools with their dominant hand. This is by no means essential however in my opinion. A vice on each end would maximise work space for each of you.

    #140139
    raze599
    Participant

    Ive got a double sided diamond plate, one side has 400 grit and the other side has 1000. Like Matt I also used it to grind bevels and flatten badly warped chisel backs. The 400 side I suspect is much finer now than when I bought it but it still works well enough. The 1000 has been subject to much more reasonable use however and is still going strong after quite a while.

    #140059
    raze599
    Participant

    My number 5 has a very loose lateral adjuster. It works, but it flops completely from one side to the other. My attempts to tighten it yielded no good results unfortunately. You get used to the rattling though in a while.

    #140042
    raze599
    Participant

    I suspect the top of my bench has some twist in it also but it never causes me an issue. If you want to use the benchtop to confirm the flatness of your workpieces then yes plane out the twist but if not then I can’t think of any downside to leaving it frankly.

    #140031
    raze599
    Participant

    Almost always it is a butt joint that is used. I can’t think of a reason why one would use a tongue and groove to edge joint boards like that, in a minority of cases possibly to help with alignment. However glues do have a reasonable time within which you can shift boards about a bit if required so the advantage is pretty much cancelled out.

    #139996
    raze599
    Participant

    I managed it decently actually a few days ago. It was 0.6mm Sapele veneer onto 6mm thick plywood I was using for the back of a cabinet. I used regular white PVA glue.

    The cabinet is approximately 3 feet wide so I had to edge joint the veneer. After a quick Google this was fairly simple.

    I used a paint roller to put the glue on as it gave a much more even spread, it was surprising how much of the bottle I had to use probably because the roller itself was soaking it all up.

    After I put the veneer on I covered it with baking paper and then with another sheet of plywood. ON top I put lots of weight for a while.

    Of course, this method didn’t come out perfect. There are ripples in the surface strangely which correspond to the stripes in the Sapele. Of course this also makes it near impossible to tell unless you run your hand over it which is good. I also had to go over some of the edges with more glue as it didnt stick down properly. Getting an even weight across a surface that large is much harder than it seems.

    Overall though it went reasonably well I think.

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