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  • #139062
    Roger Evans
    Participant

    I’m still using both a single- and a double-sided Norton stone that I’ve had since the 1960s. Granted, they haven’t been used continually over that time as my woodworking has been only a part-time hobby, but they still work very well and give a really sharp edge to plane blades and chisels.
    I’m now 76 years young and have recently inherited what was originally my grandfather’s oilstone and it too still cuts beautifully, though it is a bit dished. The thing that amazes me about this stone is its size; it measures 10″ x 2″ x 3/8″ thick! (thin?) And it’s fitted snugly in a box similar to the one Paul shows on the video, including the snipped-off nails on the underside to stop it slipping around on the bench top.
    The throwaway society doesn’t stand a chance where our family is concerned!

    • This reply was modified 3 years, 5 months ago by Roger Evans.
    #136485
    Roger Evans
    Participant

    I’m lucky enough to have inherited – at the ripe young age of 75! – a 10″ R Groves dovetail saw with the most comfortable handle I ever held! As luck, or more likely design, would have it, the two screw holes are parallel to the blade’s cutting edge, making it easy to work out the hang when I make copies for my other small backsaws, which I intend to do. The saw is now mostly cleaned up and ready for reassembly. A small repair is needed first on the top horn.

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    #136427
    Roger Evans
    Participant

    Yes, with a flat file – 2nd cut or smooth – file the whole length of the cutting edge unit lit is flat, or nearly flat if you’re in danger of losing the teeth altogether. Then sharpen in the normal way. If you’ve never sharpened a saw before watch Paul Sellars’ video. It’s excellent.

    #136426
    Roger Evans
    Participant

    A dear Uncle of mine, sadly no longer with us, asked me to sharpen a lovely 10″ dovetail saw for him which had belonged to my grandfather. The teeth were so bad I had to file them off completely and recut them to 16tpi. This must have been 40 years ago – when my eyes still worked! I remember marking them direct from a 12″ engineers’ steel rule laid alongside: tedious but not difficult. (I trained as a machine tool engineer.)
    I have now inherited that self-same saw and am currently refurbishing it. A small chunk of the upper horn of the handle is missing which needs a piece splicing in. The saw was made by R Groves in, I am told, about 1880.

    #136424
    Roger Evans
    Participant

    Retract the blade; lay a sheet of 240 grit, or finer, emery cloth on a flat surface – e.g. a piece of plate glass – and just rub the plane back and forth on the emery cloth. You might also find that the sole is hollow if the plane is well-used. This process will not only smooth out the scratch but flatten the sole as well. A light rub with wax will have your plane gliding smoothly across the timber.

    • This reply was modified 3 years, 9 months ago by Roger Evans.
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