rusty

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  • #138803
    rusty
    Participant

    A veritas cutter for their plow plane from lee valley fits in my 45, might be a good alternative. It is shorter than my 45 cutters but still works.

    #124506
    rusty
    Participant

    I think oak is a wonderful choice if that is a readily available hardwood in your area. I would make all the drawer parts out of pine, with the exception of the drawer front. If the back was going to go against a wall I would make it our of pine as well. In books they often refer to this as primary wood (oak) and secondary wood (pine or other inexpensive wood).
    Depending on your preference, you could also make the drawer bottoms and back out of plywood. Depending on what the chest would hold you could consider cedar for the drawer bottoms, might give a nice smell. Anybody have thoughts on cedar drawer bottoms.

    #122883
    rusty
    Participant

    I am a little late on my recommendation but I just tried a new product on the six christmas totes.
    I used Cabot water-based one step stain and finish on pine from Lowes, I live in Canada they are the only store that carries a water based one-step product. The product dried really quickly and the results were fantastic no prep work I did sand the end grain to 220 grit to improve the results on the end grain. This stuff doesn’t smell like the minwax oil based finish and clean up is just soap and water. I applied with a brush. I find it doesn’t create the blotching effects on pine. However you could experience what Paul would call lap marks. Treat this product like coloured shellac following the wet edge but with the advantage of being about to go over what you already did to even out brush strokes.

    http://www.cabotstain.com/products/product/Premium-Wood-Finish.html

    This is the companies link to the product. The reviews explain some of the issues people have. For me it is my new favourite method to stain pine.

    #121100
    rusty
    Participant

    Dave nice job. Did you stain the handles before the BLO. Red Mahogany perhaps??
    I used minwax red mahogany on my Philadelphia D-8 handle and it looks identical to your saw handles. I am jealous you have 4 really nice saws.
    Best of luck with the sharpening. I just recently filed one of my saws from rip to cross cut. Don’t be afraid after you got a good handle on rip filing to try the cross cut filing it is so rewarding, I like having one panel saw filed cross cut to break down my rough stock. Don’t over think it, choose a rake and fleam and go. Also, I find set to be the more important on saws.

    #120795
    rusty
    Participant

    Yes, that helps alot. It was going to be my other suggestion. If you have too much set the saw doesn’t guide itself. Paul hammers out his set, which if you have alot of set should do. I use a stone just to make the teeth even. Lie Nelson and likely others have said that if the saw tracks to one side take one pass with the stone. but with your saw set you likely won’t have that problem.

    #120794
    rusty
    Participant

    At the beginning of the cut be as accurate as you can this will guide the rest of your cut. For Ripping, I use the square and add a pencil line to the end grain to line up the saw. Just like cutting dovetails square. I start the saw lightly with the relaxed rake part of the saw the first two inches, if you file your saw like Paul.
    Cross-cutting knife line all the way around. If in the vise like Paul, I establish the cut across the width and then continue the cut but drop your hand and focus on the knife line at the boards edge. This will guide the rest of the cut. I still like to leave some so that I don’t have any tearout.
    These tips help me, find out what works for you and share. Best of luck

    #61452
    rusty
    Participant

    Jay,
    I have a metal dust pan and bench brush that has helped so I don’t just knock it on the floor. I also try not to rush when it comes to sweeping the floor.
    However, I am interested in this topic as well.

    #61413
    rusty
    Participant

    This is awesome work. BS or no BS, I admire the resawing for the back panels. Bravo!

    #59935
    rusty
    Participant

    I just remembered Paul built a small bench for the wood shows last year…which was portable. If you look at the picture before assembly you can see the tool well was glued to the apron.

    #56953
    rusty
    Participant

    Just a clear coat not paint no stain looks amazing. like that the chisel rack uses space behind drawer. Shortens the height nicely. Excellent work!

    #56698
    rusty
    Participant

    I would draw the profile you are hoping for onto the blade starting at the outside edge, you shouldn’t have to remove much material at the outside edges. I would then remove material down just at the center a 1/8th from the line. Then work on the spots in between. If there was a lot of material to remove I would use wet and dry paper as I wouldn’t want to put that much wear on my course diamond stone. After the profile was close I would use a figure of eight and a rocking motion to smooth out the differences.

    It might be worth a shot but what about a mill file, like Paul used in the round bottom plane he made. Obviously your Iron is already hardened but it might be worth a test to see if a file would take a cut.

    I did find it easy to convert a regular no4 to a scrub with just a figure of 8 but I am looking forward to Paul’s video. In your situation I would be tempted to get a grinder.

    #46078
    rusty
    Participant

    Paul decided to buy the T&G as he figured that is what most members would do. With all the pieces clamped together you could double knife wall around the entire group. Paul could also have used a crosscut saw to reduce breakage. Paul was anticipating some tear out to be hidden in the groove but he maybe did not anticipate some of the larger pieces you mention.You will notice Paul switched to the fine tenon saw part way thru. When he pulled out the panel saw I was surprised he didn’t knife all the way around.

    Gang cutting significantly reduced the amount of time to create the back panel. Efficiency in furniture making was critical with early craftsmen. The profile would be ran on the longer boards first and gang cut as Paul did.

    #38567
    rusty
    Participant

    I have a Philadelphia Disston panel saw and 12″ back saw. I had to vinegar strip the rust of the panel saw, stain the handle, sharpen the teeth and polish the nuts but it is my favourite saw and looks fantastic. The back saw was in good shape complete s light sanding to the plate with WD-40 and buffed the handle with 0000 steel wool. Both saws were less than $5. I did pay 15 for a atkins panel saw and about 20 for a Toronto Canada Disston back saw before I found these two saws but they were no comparison to the Philadelphia Disston saws I got. both filled rip, panel saw is 10tpi and the back saw is 12tpi (if I remember correctly). Knife wall makes it possible to not have a crosscut saw.

    Buy the old ones cheap and straight.

    #29048
    rusty
    Participant

    Nice Work. I wish my HD had 2x4s like that!

    #28160
    rusty
    Participant

    Greg I just used your simplified bench stool drawing to draw my own reference drawing. I did like the proportional method. As I used the 1/9 to draw the entire stool with out a measuring device. This proportional thing I find really increased my drawing ability, I will likely be purchasing by hand and eye now. I can now draw and then convert my ideas to real life. If I manage to create something unique I will remember your generosity and share with the group.
    Thank you so much for your efforts.
    Rusty

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 54 total)