Richard Senior

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Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 18 total)
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  • #139104
    Richard Senior
    Participant

    If the lacquer has gone flaky on the handles, you might also want to get some shellac and wax to refinish them. You’ll probably use these for finishing projects anyway.

    #139066
    Richard Senior
    Participant

    Could you negate both concerns by edge jointing three boards? You’d have the mortice in the middle board and, if it works aesthetically, you could also have part of each foot contained in the middle board, avoiding much of the strain on the glue line.

    For example: You want 12″ but have 6″ boards. Instead of jointing two 6″ boards as 6-6, rip one board into two 3″ boards and joint the three pieces 3-6-3 with 4″ wide feet and a 4″ gap between. The feet then extend 1″ into the middle board and your mortice hole is in solid wood.

    #138955
    Richard Senior
    Participant

    In (1), do you mean the wheel is too stiff or it has insufficient travel?

    In (2), are you sure the blade is gouging the wood and it’s not being caused by debris caught in the mouth or a rough spot on the sole?

    If you turn the plane over on its back and sight down the sole of the plane from the toe, you should be able to see if a sharp corner of the blade is sticking out.

    #138806
    Richard Senior
    Participant

    Fine india oilstones are only around 320 grit and you are finer than that with your papers. 400-600 should produce an edge that’s sharp enough for work, if not razor sharp.

    Are you getting a burr across the full width of the back of the blade when you hone the bevel? Only 1-2mm of polish on the back suggests you might need to do some more flattening but you are probably better waiting for the plates. If you are getting a burr, you are getting an edge.

    Have you tried the chisel on a piece of wood? Will it pare fine shavings? It might not slice through paper like a razor just yet but it ahould cut something like pine or spruce with ease.

    #138759
    Richard Senior
    Participant

    They are widely available. It’s a matter of knowing what to search for I think. In the UK search for walking stick ferrules. In the US try walking cane tips.

    #138757
    Richard Senior
    Participant

    You need to anticipate the chisel diving into the good wood and keep control of it so that it doesn’t. That means reading the grain (but not always trusting it), having a sharp chisel that will sever fibres rather than follow them, choking back on the blade so it doesn’t run away with you, watching the line and the progress of the cut, and controlling the angle of the chisel with the pushing hand. So baby shavings if necessary, but mostly having control over the cut.

    Try a file on a practice joint and see if you are still tempted. 😉

    #138592
    Richard Senior
    Participant

    IMO those boards are wide enough that you are asking for trouble.

    Is there a reason that the grain on the sides must be vertical? Could you laminate the sides to get your 17-25″ height?

    #138403
    Richard Senior
    Participant

    I still use Norton India stones (coarse -> medium -> fine). If they become badly cupped or grooved, I flatten them with a really cheap coarse diamond plate (which must be flat, obviously). The diamond plate gets clogged eventually and needs cleaning under running water with a toothbrush and a drop of detergent. Rinse the plate with water and repeat until the stone is flat.

    IMO, although the coarse stones (grey/black silicon carbide) are quite fast, the medium and fine (orange/brown aluminium oxide) are much slower.

    #138337
    Richard Senior
    Participant

    Looking good. I wonder if the wood is spruce?

    I’ve used raised beds for vegetables in the past and I would suggest thinking about a frame that fits over the top with some sort of wire mesh to keep birds from snacking on your seedlings. Maybe hinged, maybe just laid on top and stored somewhere when not needed.

    #138175
    Richard Senior
    Participant

    It is usually sealed with a brown paper tape. Search for “framers tape” or “framing tape”.

    Some commercial frames have small metal tabs that fold over the backing material but I just checked the back of some photographs I had framed professionally about 15 years ago and they are just framing tape (and it is still secure).

    #138171
    Richard Senior
    Participant

    That is beautifully done. Those tenons look perfect from here and everything looks crisp and accurate. If that’s your first attempt at woodworking it’s very impressive — it looks like some great things are destined to be made on that bench.

    #138165
    Richard Senior
    Participant

    The main difference between the 778 and 78 is that the 778 has a two-armed fence. According to record-planes.com, the Record 778 was an adaptation of the Woden W78, which was an adaptation of the Record #78. I assume the Record #78 was based on the Stanley #78, as were several others — I have a Sargent #79 and it is the same pattern.

    #138095
    Richard Senior
    Participant

    On a slightly different note, are you using a weatherproof wood glue? If the bench is covered, it shouldn’t be a major issue, but probably a sensible precaution. Evo Stik Weatherproof glue is widely available in the UK (look out for the blue rather than green bottle) and I’ve used it successfully on outdoor projects that are left out in the rain.

    #138087
    Richard Senior
    Participant

    I have a Stanley Handyman (12-204, plastic fittings, maroon paint) that I bought new in the UK around 1996 and it has been good to me. I see stories of them not even being fit for use as doorstops but mine has done all sorts of joinery and household work, including planing endgrain on hardwood door stiles. The 1950s Stanley No 4 that I later inherited feels nicer in the hands with the wooden handles and brass depth adjustment, and is less prone to tear out, but I still use the Handyman for squaring up stock. We seem to have more of an understanding when it comes to getting an edge square.

    I think there has been a wide variation in planes that Stanley labelled as Handyman over the years. The casting on mine is almost identical to the No 4, the only difference I can see being the frog adjustment screw, which this Handyman variant omits. It likes the frog set back and nowhere else, so adjustment isn’t helpful on it anyway.

    #137958
    Richard Senior
    Participant

    You should expect joints to need some fine tuning to fit well: cutting fat and paring down, planing flush. Obviously the more experienced the woodworker, the closer to fit from the initial cut, but watch Paul’s “three joints” series again and you’ll see plenty of fine tuning going on. I’ve seen people use a straight edge as the tenon is fitted to decide which side of the tenon to pare and get it closer to flush. I’d just run a plane over it. Or a sander.

    I’ve not tried the scalloped M&T but it looks quite tricky to get a perfect fit on the curved shoulder. The bottom line with a saw is whether it saws stuff and the joint fit isn’t critical to that. I made one years ago and the joints were really sloppy, but it still worked well as a saw.

    Don’t beat yourself up over it. Aiming for perfection is a good thing but expecting to achieve it causes no end of trouble, especially on your early projects. You’ll get better (but you’ll still need to fine tune your joints).

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 18 total)