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Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 32 total)
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  • #456347
    SmokyRick Crawford
    Participant

    For carving techniques, you may want to visit MaryMay.com. She has great carving instructions and a forum with knowledgeable folks who will help you along the way.

    In the middle of Northern Illinois, USA

    #456338
    SmokyRick Crawford
    Participant

    I love the cross design. This is a lovely cabinet.

    In the middle of Northern Illinois, USA

    #448602
    SmokyRick Crawford
    Participant

    A rebate along each joining edge would allow them to slide against each other for fit, and increase the glue surface for strength.

    In the middle of Northern Illinois, USA

    #448597
    SmokyRick Crawford
    Participant

    I certainly can’t see any reason it shouldn’t work. Just realize that it would be a permanent joint. That won’t come apart for moving day.!

    In the middle of Northern Illinois, USA

    #446784
    SmokyRick Crawford
    Participant

    That is quite beautiful. Really enjoy the looks of this with all the joinery. Must have taken a good bit of time to do all that. Very nice.!

    In the middle of Northern Illinois, USA

    #440171
    SmokyRick Crawford
    Participant

    Yes this can still be done by some of us. One of my other hobbies is blacksmithing. Here in the US we have a good organization of smiths. ABANA (the Artist Blacksmith Association of America) is a great organization and the local chapters have groups of guys just like this forum. I was a member of UMBA (the Upper Midwest Blacksmith Association) for many years till my eyes started getting too bad to see the colors as I needed to. I have never seen the separate piece of steel used for tempering like that before, very cool.

    In the middle of Northern Illinois, USA

    #438385
    SmokyRick Crawford
    Participant

    I would think you might want to saw next to the glue joint, then use a scrub plane to take the glue line out. Maybe someone else will join in and say something else …

    In the middle of Northern Illinois, USA

    #428226
    SmokyRick Crawford
    Participant

    Very nice indeed. I don’t believe I have ever heard of brown oak before. Is it a local thing? Whatever it is, this turned out great!

    Well, I just googled and found this about brown oak.:
    http://www.wood-database.com/brown-oak/
    Pretty interesting.

    In the middle of Northern Illinois, USA

    #426179
    SmokyRick Crawford
    Participant

    @mossy-cup I am over near Rochelle. From what has been said, I am wondering if you have got the idea of paring correct. To pare the wood down should be a small movement at a time with the hands both on the chisel. Slightly moving the chisel to slice the wood away from the area needed. I guess slice is the key word. While you are talking about “shooting to the sky” I am thinking of someone starting to remove the bulk of the waste, rather than paring the last little bit out. Paring should involve some sideways movement of the chisel which facilitates with the slicing action.

    In the middle of Northern Illinois, USA

    #425405
    SmokyRick Crawford
    Participant

    Are you cutting from every edge toward the middle? If not, this may help. This is all that I can think of from what you describe.

    In the middle of Northern Illinois, USA

    #423654
    SmokyRick Crawford
    Participant

    Very nice. Thanks for posting this.

    In the middle of Northern Illinois, USA

    #419061
    SmokyRick Crawford
    Participant

    It is an “easy to work” wood with about the same strength as pine, but not near the strength of oak or maple. Usually a nice looking wood, but not strikingly beautiful in most cases, it is easier in some locals to get acquire than more expensive hard woods. In the end it is all a choice of what you want to use, and for what purpose.
    to see more about this wood, see this link :
    http://www.wood-database.com/poplar/

    In the middle of Northern Illinois, USA

    #419029
    SmokyRick Crawford
    Participant

    Perhaps there is a joint in the front or the back that we can’t see, but the legs appear to be simply glued together. The dowels that hold the “shelf” in place appear to be through the front leg only. This is not a terribly secure joint, but how long has this been in use? Maybe it is good enough? If I was going to make one, I think I would put a mortise in from the rear to join the 2 legs together. (Or at least some dowels which would keep with the current theme.) If it is a blind tenon (or dowels), it would never be seen from the front, but would still do a good job of strengthening the legs.

    In the middle of Northern Illinois, USA

    #417172
    SmokyRick Crawford
    Participant

    Well, for temporary that looks pretty nice. I noticed a shorter saw bench there. (Or what i took to be such.) I have several sawhorses which are all knee high to me. When my kids were young and in 4H, they had a wood working class which I taught. We made these, they were my design. I still have 5 of them myself, if I remember correctly. They are great for sawing because I can put a knee on whatever I am cutting. They work well for younger kids because they can reach easily. In combination they work as a work surface (pretty low for a man, but good for kids). Several of the kids in that class have told me they still use their sawhorses.

    In the middle of Northern Illinois, USA

    #410553
    SmokyRick Crawford
    Participant

    Lovely!

    In the middle of Northern Illinois, USA

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 32 total)