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  • #309092
    sodbuster
    Participant

    Nicely done! I too have found the seat shaping (for me, on a windsor chair) to be a real education in reading grain direction. It helped me to make a small round-both-ways plane to scoop out the seat.

    FWIW when I am using SPF for projects I tend to use nice 2 x 10’s and rip them. I find they are more stable and have less knots than the 2 x 4 or 2 x 6. Those pin knots are rally hard o the edges of my tools.

    • This reply was modified 2 years, 11 months ago by sodbuster.
    #309091
    sodbuster
    Participant

    I love the continuous grain around the sides. On proportions – I suspect there is a natural limit to the width of the sides, depending on the size of the user’s hand. Even with rubber feet I would likely want one hand on the base as I turned the handle.

    That said, how would you feel about a slightly wider, and slightly shorter, base-box? Messing about with some cardboard mockups might give you proportions that please your eye. (I’m thinking of Tolpin’s ‘by hand & eye’ here, of course).

    It’s a great piece, both as woodwork and as a coffee-making tool.

    Cheers!

    #143249
    sodbuster
    Participant

    I’m with you on the satisfaction of having a set of often-used tools ready to hand. My four go-to handplanes now sit on the tablesaw behind my workbench. Easy to guess what gets used more.

    #143247
    sodbuster
    Participant

    Gary Rogowski is one of the writers who has advocated warming up with a simple dovetail joint..

    • This reply was modified 3 years, 1 month ago by sodbuster.
    #136541
    sodbuster
    Participant

    I agree with my fellow Westerner on the tusk tenons. There are some online examples – e.g. moravian workbench – you could search for to look at. One drawback of these for a bed is the possible “ouch factor” for shins with the protruding tenons. Also tricky if the headboard needs to be flush to the wall.

    There are historical hardware solutions – look for bed bolts – that are in common use & don’t have the drawback of a projection past the bedpost. Lee Valley is one provider of a specialized bedbolt that does not require a hole all the way through the bedpost.

    Hope this helps!
    (Hi Peter – I’m an ex-pat in Upper Canada now but grew up in Regina.)

    #136207
    sodbuster
    Participant

    Tool geek warning! 🙂 Axes, like planes, come with different shapes and weights for different purposes.

    It used to be that the best way to get a timber to frame with, was to start onsite with a tree. One kind of axe to cut it down, another to limb it, then the squaring starts. First, snap a chalk line. Then make cuts from the outside of the tree up to the line every foot or so. That leaves a bunch of notches. Then split off the wood between the notches, and smooth the face of the log. Only three more to go and there is a timber. One kind of axe cuts cross-grain to make the notch. The the broad-axe splits off the chunks and smooths the surface with cross-grain paring cuts. The broadaxe is very heavy, single-bevel, and either the handle or the axe is angled to give clearance between the log and the hands. In use it is more dropped than swung. The process of using the brodaxe is called “hewing to the line” in some places. Dialects may vary. Your pictures are, I am pretty sure, a broadaxe.
    Restoring it will be difficult because of the rust on the one face.
    Here are some pics of one of my broad hatchets (or carpenter’s axe), used in a similar way on a smaller scale. The edge on mine is about 4 – 5 inches. I like the single bevel for control compared to a regular double-bevel axe. Yes it matters if you are right or left-handed with these.

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    #136135
    sodbuster
    Participant

    I am right handed, and like you I have a ways to go before I get my crosscuts down. Lately I have had better success with this approach: I put most pieces on a bench hook, (not in the vise) and have shop lights (architect style on articulate arm) that can shine from left or right on a fairly low angle. This give me better visibility / definition of the knife line. I generally cut with the waste to the right of the saw-plate. I try to start the cut on the far edge of the piece (using a western style saw). I focus first on getting the saw straight across. Then once I have a good kerf going I focus mostly on the cut being vertical to the surface of the piece.

    My success rate has got better lately when I pay attention to my stance and to having a very relaxed grip on the saw tote – just enough so the saw doesn’t fall out of my hand. I have also found that checking whether my shoulders are relaxed and natural, or tight, is helpful. And of course my forefinger is pointing forward, not gripping the tote.

    I haven’t worked as much on exactly where my eye (and which eye) is with respect to the saw – I try to have a view that feels right. It seems to be more a function of practice, stance, and grip for me, with a few different saws.

    It may sound daft but I try to get it straight with the breadknife at home, and also on firewood at the cottage. Practice and paying attention do seem to help.

    Good luck!

    #135983
    sodbuster
    Participant

    Lovely! The banding around the edges really sets off the figured top.

    #135768
    sodbuster
    Participant

    I got my upgraded plane back in just a few days after dropping it at the local LV store.

    It looks to me that the upgrade is just running a bevel on one side of the skate. Someone handy with a file or with a machinist in the family might be able to DIY the upgrade.

    I plan to try my Stanley 45 beading blade in the upgraded plow plane. The grooving blades for the 45 fit the Veritas, so maybe the beading blade will fit too…

    #135439
    sodbuster
    Participant

    I have found that careful layout & marking – on both faces of the board – help me, as does practice. I will also look at my tail cuts and test them with a square, then trim the tails a bit if required to square them up before I mark for the pins. It gets better with practice, and the sawing accuracy helps with other operations too – e.g. tenons.

    I haven’t tried any of the various jigs out there. I suspect that positioning the jig might introduce some errors as well.

    #135438
    sodbuster
    Participant

    I find too that working on a ‘real’ project increases my attention & motivation. That’s why I switched to making boxes after the first few days. I do find some warm-up practice is worthwhile though. I sometimes will make a dozen or so sawcuts to some lines in a piece of scrap that is destined for the woodstove anyway.

    #135394
    sodbuster
    Participant

    Thanks, and sorry to be slow responding. I have finished my beta-version radius plane – poplar, with a 36mm replacement blade part # 07P1011 from LV. This size works well when using nominal 2″ thick stock – which is 1 1/2″ or 38mm from the lumberyard. width at centre 1 13/16″, overall length 6″, max height 1 3/4″. long radius approx 7″, short radius approx 3″. bed angle 45 degrees.

    The LV blade was low-cost, easy to flatten & sharpen, and has done well in use so far.

    I made it from an offcut. Intended use was for saddling a windsor chair seat after the scorp. I had a lovely old plane with a repurposed 2″ blade, but it didn’t have a tight enough radius either fore – aft or port – starboard.

    What worked:
    – larger size – I started with about 7 ” long stock. It fits the hand pretty well.
    – rounding fore & aft, with a slightly narrower stern – coffin – again for hand comfort
    – using dowels in the blank to keep parts aligned in glue-up <– top tip

    Better next time:
    – precision in marking / sawing / filing ledges for each side of wedge.
    – bolder, bigger throat opening to start. The round blade scoops up shavings that jam easily in a narrow throat.
    – better attantion to marking pieces and hand-planing the inside faces for a better glueline
    – maybe a wider radius across – 4″ maybe.

    Attachments:
    #134341
    sodbuster
    Participant

    Nice work Jude! What did you use as a starting block, & what final dimensions? I am making a radius plane for a windsor chair bottom & am looking for input on sizing, radius both long-ways & across, …

    Cheers,
    John

    #129801
    sodbuster
    Participant

    Many thanks for sharing the experience & the link. I have some saws in the rehab queue myself. This will help a lot.

    #129597
    sodbuster
    Participant

    Nice work. From the grain flecks on the stem I am pretty confident it is made of beech. Ikea uses a lot of that wood, and our friend Paul highlighted in the plane-making video that beech is the classic wood for toolmaking. I would say you made out like a bandit with your upcycled chair.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 20 total)