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  • #142162
    TaDa Man
    Participant

    I don’t know for sure, but it looks like an off brand copy of something like a Stanley #110 or #120 block plane.

    http://www.supertool.com/StanleyBG/stan12.htm (Patrick’s reviews can be a bit harsh)

    I am sure if the steel of the blade is OK and sharpened well, it should work just fine.

    Because Everybody Deserves a Little Fanfare.

    #141284
    TaDa Man
    Participant

    @boxian – One thing to look for in any saw is that the handle is comfortable. I spent a little more for a disposable saw with a wood handle that I could shape for a better fit. If I recall the total cost was under $25.00 for a saw.

    Here are some of Paul’s writings on fitting a saw to your hand, well worth the read.

    https://paulsellers.com/2014/10/questions-answered-sizing-saw-handles/
    https://paulsellers.com/2013/12/just-another-saw-look/
    https://paulsellers.com/2011/09/saw-handles-revisited/
    https://paulsellers.com/2011/09/hand-saw-handles-revisited/

    Because Everybody Deserves a Little Fanfare.

    #141224
    TaDa Man
    Participant

    One quick note on saws. Paul had some thoughts on buying inexpensive new saws that are sharpenable here: https://paulsellers.com/2016/04/comparing-saws-getting-started/

    I wish I had done more research and bought a sharpenable saw, but one disposable saw to get you started is not the end of the world.

    I actually bought a disposable saw with hardened teeth from the home center, so I could build my workbench and have a vise so I can practice sharpening the vintage saws that were handed down to me from my grandfathers. When the disposable saw finally is too dull to use, I am planning on making a planing stop for my bench, and using some of the rest of the plate for making scrapers and chair devils.

    Just $0.02 from the peanut gallery.

    Because Everybody Deserves a Little Fanfare.

    #141205
    TaDa Man
    Participant

    Here are a couple of resources.

    There is an article on building hollows & rounds in the April 2016 issue of Popular Woodworking magazine.

    http://www.popularwoodworking.com/articleindex/roubo-hollows-rounds

    Lie-Nielson also sells a set of DVDs about making side escapement planes: ie. Hollows, Rounds, and moulding planes.

    https://www.lie-nielsen.com/product/making-traditional-side-escapement-planes

    One tip from the Popular Woodworking article is to make the round first, you can mark out the curve with a compass and form it with a bench plane. Then when the round is done, you can use it to form the hollow. This insures that you make a matched hollow and round.

    Because Everybody Deserves a Little Fanfare.

    #141115
    TaDa Man
    Participant

    Here is another recipe for making your own liquid hide glue from the folks at Mortise & Tenon Magazine.

    http://mortise-tenon-magazine.myshopify.com/blogs/blog/how-to-make-your-own-liquid-hide-glue

    I need to give it a try, I have been using OBG with good results.

    Because Everybody Deserves a Little Fanfare.

    #141114
    TaDa Man
    Participant

    One book that seems to have polarizing opinions about it is “The Anarchist’s Tool Chest” By Christopher Schwarz. I think it is a great compliment to Paul Seller’s “Essential Woodworking Hand Tools” you can compare and contrast the tools that both authors feel make good set of tools for furniture making. Also in one of the appendices in the back of ATC is the recommended tool lists from five or six older books on getting started in woodworking and tool selection.

    I agree with the original post, both of Paul’s books are great. I also agree that “Woodwork Joints” by Charles Hayward is a keeper (Look for a used hardcover, mine was a discard from a HS library). Bob Flexner’s book “Understanding Wood Finishes” is a MUST READ in my opinion. The Essential Woodworker by Robert Wearing is a solid read, it made me think about techniques more than tools.

    By Hand and Eye (and By Hound and Eye) by George Walker and Jim Tolpin are also good books. By Hound and Eye was a disappointment for me, I have an engineering degree and do a lot of technical drawing, so I understood By Hand and Eye on the first read and there was not really much new information in By Hound and Eye. If By Hand and Eye has you a little baffled or confused By Hound and Eye is a great companion, otherwise you will not miss much by skipping it.

    Because Everybody Deserves a Little Fanfare.

    #141053
    TaDa Man
    Participant

    I am a bit late to this thread, but another suggestion is to change your grip. I have very large hands and I have the same issue, especially on my #3. I switched to an open grip like you would use on a wooden coffin smoother. So instead of just pointing your index finger and resting it on the frog, I point all four of my fingers and I just grip the handle with my thumb. This helped me in two ways, it avoids the interference with the wheel, and it helped me stop “bulldoging” the plane as PS would say.

    $0.02 from the peanut gallery. YMMV (Your Milage May Vary)

    Because Everybody Deserves a Little Fanfare.

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