Blanket Chest: Episode 5

Blanket Chest Episode 5 Keyframe

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Once all of the panels and frames are together, Paul refines the shape of the legs. Then the bottom rails are arched to tie them in with the shaped legs.

14 Comments

  1. robertparsons81 on 25 April 2018 at 3:44 pm

    Thanks Paul so many great tips in this episode great job to you and the gang

  2. jurgen01 on 25 April 2018 at 4:14 pm

    A great video with a lot of helpful information about techniques for working in difficult woods.
    Well done — again!

  3. JamesWilliams on 25 April 2018 at 8:40 pm

    I love what you’re all doing with the new video techniques. I can’t wait to see what you do in the future with your new space, and to make this lovely blanket chest. Thank you.

  4. Timothy Sweeney on 26 April 2018 at 2:17 am

    What are Paul’s thoughts on circular planes? I have a well fettled Stanley #20, and it would make quick and accurate work of the arches.

    On a side note: Jimmy, Robert and the boys make quite good shop music. Herr Mozart is delightful for contemplative design.

    Thank you for the hard work!

  5. willg on 26 April 2018 at 5:12 am

    Nice job sawing the curve. I’ll have to give that a try and stick it in the bag of tricks.

  6. harry wheeler on 26 April 2018 at 3:43 pm

    Paul – great project! I decided to go with hard maple for the legs and rails for my chest. It was really just a matter of material thickness and maple was what I could locate in 10/4 stock. I’ve milled all the material and completed the basic work on the legs and I’m ready to fit the rails. I just noticed that one of my long rails has revolted and developed a slight bow. If I pinch all four at one end, I have about a 1/8″ gap at the far end on that one rail and it seems to be a pretty uniform sweep so laying flat, it’s out about 1/16″ in the center. I can pinch it flat with just hand pressure. Because the grain is so nice and it matches the other rails so well, I would like to keep it. If I use it as the bottom rear rail, do you think it will cause a problem when it comes time to install the bottom? The back panel might straighten it a little but I’m not counting on that. More than likely, the rail will bow the panel slightly. What are your thoughts?

    • jakegevorgian on 27 April 2018 at 4:56 am

      It’s hard to predict what will wood decide to do.

      If it wants to bow more it will. If it decides to twist, no doubt, it will.

      I usually give it a go andhope it works well. Then if it doesn’t, I start to come up with design additions to bring back the cupping or bowing.

      Hope I was helpful.

    • Philip Adams on 27 April 2018 at 10:53 am

      Hello Harry,
      Paul said that if you use this piece at the bottom and put the bow to the inside, the base piece of the box will push it out when fitted. You may have to be careful when fitting the panel to align it, but should work out well.

      • harry wheeler on 27 April 2018 at 6:01 pm

        Thank you Philip and thanks to Paul also. I expect that panel will put up a bit of a fight but I think if I’m careful, as you said, it should work. Besides, I have lots of clamps and some really big hammers if it give me too much trouble.

  7. tomleg on 27 April 2018 at 2:28 am

    Murphy says that if you don’t check both sides, that’s when the saw will twist and cut on the wrong side of your line.

  8. robdavies on 2 January 2019 at 5:54 pm

    Evening guys,
    Could any one tell me what glue Paul would have used to glue that piece of wood back on that split off when shaping the arch in one of his rails?

    • Izzy Berger on 4 January 2019 at 3:10 pm

      Hi Rob,

      He would have used PVA glue if it’s structural. Sometimes he might use super glue.

      Izzy

      • robdavies on 4 January 2019 at 4:10 pm

        Thanks Izzy, I tried gluing the piece in with pva last night so will see how I got on later. Thank you

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