Building a small woodworking workshop

  • Creator
    Topic
  • #556554
    Zeppos
    Participant

    I’ve started the build for a small woodworking workshop. It’s going to be 15m2 ( measuring from the outside walls) as that’s the maximum I can build without a building permit. I will have a “shed roof”, with one large sliding set of windows of 4m towards the north to avoid direct sunlight (when we sell the house somebody else can use it as a studio for instance). I plan to put a small deck in front of the window too. The building including the foundation will be around 3m high at the front (window side).

    I just finished the foundation and floor base. Attached are some pictures on the progress. If there’s an interest I’ll document the project here, let me know.

    I had to take out some trees that were close to the house and started to lean in, so I used the freed up space for the workshop building. I used 12 x 1.2m long screws that were drilled in the ground, on which I have built a wooden base frame. For the surrounding trees, this is better than a concrete foundation according to my tree-guy (or arborist).

    Next is starting the framing for the walls, starting tomorrow.

    • This topic was modified 3 months ago by Zeppos.
    Attachments:
Viewing 11 replies - 1 through 11 (of 11 total)
  • Author
    Replies
  • #556565
    Sven-Olof Jansson
    Participant

    @sojansson

    Very good (Scandinavian, I guess) construction, which I will be happy to see evolve into a complete workshop.

    /Sven-Olof

    Sven-Olof Jansson
    London, UK; Cambridge, MA

    #556566
    Zeppos
    Participant

    @zeppos

    Yes, living in Sweden, I’m not Swedish though but enjoy the building style a lot versus standard brick and mortar.

    #558101
    Zeppos
    Participant

    @zeppos

    A short update, a bit of progress on my new workshop. See picture. I hope to get a bit less rain so I can progress quicker.

    [attachment file=”558103″]

    • This reply was modified 2 months, 2 weeks ago by Zeppos.
    • This reply was modified 2 months, 2 weeks ago by Zeppos.
    Attachments:
    #558110
    Sven-Olof Jansson
    Participant

    @sojansson

    Looks really nice; and spring has come!

    Sven-Olof Jansson
    London, UK; Cambridge, MA

    #558285
    Pavel Derka
    Participant

    @pavel_d

    I’m very interested in seeing your project come to life. Keep the photos coming.

    How high is the ceiling of the structure?

    #558290
    Zeppos
    Participant

    @zeppos

    The Total height of the structure is 3m (max for a buildimg without a permit here). The subfloor is at 40cm. So once finished internal height to ceiling Will be around 235cm at heighest point, 215 at lowest.

    #562986
    Zeppos
    Participant

    @zeppos

    The roof is going on. The window should arrive this week. I hope to be able to finish the basic roof and window installation next week.

    Attachments:
    #563012
    Sven-Olof Jansson
    Participant

    @sojansson

    Just out of curiosity. I didn’t see the “ubiquitous yellow plastic pipe” carrying electric cables. I mean, after insulation and a heat-pump you will be very set.

    Sven-Olof Jansson
    London, UK; Cambridge, MA

    #570462
    Zeppos
    Participant

    @zeppos

    The electrician is coming on Monday to check out the installation.

    I got my window delivered so weather permitting I will finish the roof this weekend and install the window. pictures after the weekend.

    • This reply was modified 2 months, 1 week ago by Zeppos.
    #581606
    Zeppos
    Participant

    @zeppos

    It has taken a while for more updates, but I have made good progress. Roof is on, panels and window installed. I’m now putting in the floor and first part of electricity should be installed this week.

    Then I can put in the insulation and finish the interior walls. I’m considering just to put OSB (I have some left overs) on the walls and ceiling. Any recommendations though?

    Attachments:
    #581956
    Sven-Olof Jansson
    Participant

    @sojansson

    Couldn’t agree more: really good progress.

    We have an old soldier’s croft from 1804, which we bought in 2006. The previous owner had clad the inner faces of the logs (it’s a log house) with OSB, and despite wallpaper with a layer of paint on top, the OSB absorbed moisture until there was a heating system that kept the indoor temperature constantly above >15 – 16 °C.

    There used to be a thatched roof, which, under the pressure of insurance fees, was replaced by a tin one. I am now insulating the attic, and have learnt that sunlight can make tin roofs very hot, resulting in sweating of moisture from underlying wooden roof, with condensation occurring on the plastic beneath the insulation slabs (i.e. facing the attic, which on a sunny day during summer becomes the coolest surface). It has taken some time to reduce the moisture content of the wooden roof.

    All in all: you might come to the conclusion that plaster boards have their advantages (to say nothing about mineral boards)!?

    Sven-Olof Jansson
    London, UK; Cambridge, MA

    Attachments:
Viewing 11 replies - 1 through 11 (of 11 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.