Clock dimensions. Can they be changed?

  • Creator
    Topic
  • #3431
    Anonymous

    Paul what is the maximum dimensions you would go to with this pattern of clock.
    Thanks
    Ken

Viewing 15 replies - 1 through 15 (of 19 total)
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    Replies
  • #3468
    Paul Sellers
    Keymaster

    @paul-sellers

    I just made two clocks in oak and have wood picked out for a larger one. As soon as I get a break in the Month-long class I am in the middle of I will check my drawings for the dimensions and let you know.

    #3470
    Anonymous

    Ok Paul many thanks

    #3484
    Rob Young
    Participant

    @rwyoung

    re: changing the dimensions –

    It seems to me that a viable strategy would be to locate the clock mechanism you want to use FIRST before embarking on making the clock in any form.  Then get out the paper and pencil or start up SketchUp or whatever and draw.

    That said, I’ve got the clock queued for starting in February when I get back from business trips and have time to DO SOMETHING!  In the mean time I have a couple of drawings started, mostly to fiddle with embellishments such as an alternate base or perhaps a touch of chip carving in the panel below the clock face (or chip carve the face instead of using a factory made one!).  Not a huge fan of Shaker furniture for the sake of being a fan of Shaker furniture.  Nothing wrong with exploring and experimenting with design.

    Especially if you own a fireplace.

     

    #3497
    Anonymous

    From past experience training apprentices and having been apprenticed many moons ago, I’d sincerely err on the side of caution in terms of adjusting designs at this stage of training.  Material types, specific dimensions and design elements exist in each grouping of lessons with the primary intention of enhancing skill sets whilst introducing specific woodworking  joints and practices.  Scope for adjustments in dimensions and styles increase massively once each exercise has reached completion.

    Potentially the best approach would be to work this project to the letter and then use the knowledge and skills gained to adapt elements for future projects.

    #3499
    Anonymous

    All great advice guys, but I’m sure Paul knows what he is doing 🙂

    #3509
    Rob Young
    Participant

    @rwyoung

    Continuing with the descending opinion:

    Given the simplicity of the design and joinery (do not confuse “simple” with “precise”) I see no reason NOT to encourage some variation so long as it is well considered and appropriate for the joinery.   For example, don’t expect a housed dado and stub tenons to be appropriate as the structural joinery for a tall-case clock.  But for small wall clock or mantle clock, just fine.  And if all one can locate locally is a small 3″ clock face, then by all means, scale down the overall size to match (consider also thinning the material from 3/4″ too).   Obviously, through a little Google-foo and on-line shopping properly sized clock faces and movements are easily found but some people prefer to shop locally.  And through a quirk of geography & expense of shipping, I can source black cherry for the same or less than good quality (#1 A or B select) eastern white pine or “red” pine (radiata) so choosing a different material may make the project more accessible to some.

    It has been my experience (painfully earned) that the goal of teaching should be to inspire the desire.  If one simply wants to learn rote and make exact copies then work on an assembly line and give up your soul.  Learn enough to learn more.    So, once a person learns the mechanical portion (i.e. sharpening, plane use, chisel use, joinery) they should expand their horizons.

    (And the “inspire the desire” bit I lifted from somewhere but I can’t remember where so can’t give attribution.  Also, corny.)

    So in summary, don’t listen to Gary and I bicker over the minutia.  Go make several dozen clocks instead!

    #3510
    Anonymous

    AMAZING

    A simple post my Paul
    I’m in the middle of making two more clocks, both in oak, and just made the panels from some quartersawn oak. Please, also think about changing the dimensions on your next clock. This pattern lends itself to midsize clocks too, so look out some clock parts and think of adding pendulum movements too.

    A simple question by me.
    Paul what is the maximum dimensions you would go to with this pattern of clock.
    Thanks
    Ken

    A simple answer by Paul

    I just made two clocks in oak and have wood picked out for a larger one. As soon as I get a break in the Month-long class I am in the middle of I will check my drawings for the dimensions and let you know.

    Leads to endless ramblings, witch will probably continue, and remind me why I tend to stay away from forums. 🙂

    #3524
    Anonymous

    That’s very nice work and a sound timber choice too Gregory 🙂  I hope you’re enjoying the experience 😉

    ————

    Hi Ken,

    I’ll not be arguing or rambling my friend. 🙂  I simply thought Rob’s suggestion might risk drawing attention from the specifics laid out in lesson form by Paul, as it had potential to cause others to dart off in different directions instead of following the lesson plans.

    #3536
    Rob Young
    Participant

    @rwyoung

    Ken, don’t let my rambling put you off the use of this forum.  This tangent could (should?) move to a separate thread.

    #3627
    Joseph Sellers
    Keymaster

    @joseph

    @rwyoung, @gazpal and @ken

     

    I am sure that nothing was said or implied that had anything other than the best intentions but let’s remember that online forums are particularly prone to arguments and misunderstanding. Please help to make this one the exception. Be extra careful.

     

    Thanks.

     

    P.S. I have moved this to its own topic.

    #3648
    Ron Harper
    Participant

    @ronharper

    I was wondering about making it shorter to stand on a shelf or dresser?

    #3668
    Anonymous

    Hi Ron,

    It can certainly be done, but the resulting project would need scaling down to match it’s location and consideration for a plinth and materials dimensions.

    #3687
    Ron Harper
    Participant

    @ronharper

    If I recuce the height to ten inches then  make the thickness say 5/8 ?

    #3688
    Anonymous

    Hi Ron,

    I’d honestly need to draw it in order to determine dimensions, because the knock on affect will impact upon rail, panel, dado/rebate width & depth, etc..  I’m certainly not saying it can’t be done, because it can, but I am saying it would need to be practical to make whilst also aesthetically pleasing.

    #3698
    Anonymous

    Hi Ron,

    The case could be made and look very good at 50% it’s original size and would stand at approx 9-1/4″ tall x 6″ wide x 2-1/2″ deep  and the clock would perhaps look best if mounted centrally within the raised panel. 🙂

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