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Diamond Stones

  • Creator
    Topic
  • #123416
    Christopher
    Participant

    Ive got a question about easy lap v’s DMT I purchased eleven different DMT stones six bench two different sizes three Duo Sharp Combo stones and two different mesh lapping stones. The Bench stones I hardly used and the fine is courser than the course. In addition Im not getting near the edge as I do on my water stones. And I have really tried to give them a good chance to shine. Not to mention that I cant flatten anything on them. I can polish but thats it. I tried to flatten a chisel back, Well several of them I think four in all. Older Vintage Stanley 750’s and some older Marples. Like if I flatten the back on the course and then go to the fine it will show a concave still on the chisel and Im talking allot too. I called DMT but that conversation ended right where it started. So Im wondering if easy lap are the ones to buy? Thanks Chris

    A man who has made a reputation for his goods knows its value as well as its cost and will maintain them. H.D. est 1887

Viewing 10 replies - 1 through 10 (of 10 total)
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    Replies
  • #123418
    dwaugh
    Participant

    @dwaugh

    Christopher, the diamond stones do take some “break in”. I started with a coarse stone, and then got a medium and fine. The medium and fine, when new, were MUCH coarser than the coarse. Mine are still settling in, but I took advantage of the new stones being so coarse by flattening plane soles and other things that needed lots of material removed.

    #123421
    Christopher
    Participant

    @flatboarder1

    are you speaking about the DMT or easylap?

    A man who has made a reputation for his goods knows its value as well as its cost and will maintain them. H.D. est 1887

    #123422
    Christopher
    Participant

    @flatboarder1

    are you speaking about the DMT or Ezlap

    A man who has made a reputation for his goods knows its value as well as its cost and will maintain them. H.D. est 1887

    #123424
    Derek Long
    Participant

    @delong1974

    How much time did you spend on the coarse? If your chisel back is still concave, go back to the course and put in the elbow grease until you have a consistent even polish along the back edge, then go to the fine. It does take some sweat equity in the tool. Its hard not be impatient about it when you want to get to work, but its worth it in the end to spend a few hours at it.

    Derek Long
    Denver, Colorado

    #123425
    Dave Riendeau
    Participant

    @dave

    If you have the Coarse DMT then I think it’s rated at 250 grit. It’s not coarse enough to lap iron. You need something like 60 – 80 grit to start. I gave up trying to lap irons on a sharpening stone and went the route of a piece of 3/8 in glass and use 60 grit sandpaper to get it flat, it takes much less time. I work up to 1000 grit sandpaper and switch to my 8000 water stone for polishing.

    -Canada

    #123428
    Fredrik Hultin
    Participant

    @fredrikhultin

    I just bought the DMT stones, course, fine and superfine.

    I does really take a lot of job to flatten the chisel backs and you have to put in a lot of elbow grease. In the end they are perfect so keep at it. The stones really changed a lot during the first hours, especially the fine stones that transformed from course to fine with usage. It actually says so on the packs as well (something about showing more diamond when being used).

    #123430
    Christopher
    Participant

    @flatboarder1

    uh I see. Let me ask you this what about using the veritas Mark II jig on the diamond stone will the diamonds eat up the brass rollers up pretty fast.?

    A man who has made a reputation for his goods knows its value as well as its cost and will maintain them. H.D. est 1887

    #123431
    Wesley
    Participant

    @weslee

    Hi Christopher,
    I own the Veritas mkII jig and a set of EZ lap diamond plates. You can use them together, no problem. The only thing the jig needs from time to time is a drop of oil to keep the roller running smoothly.

    For me at least it takes 2 to 3 times longer to sharpen using the jig. It’s hard to put pressure on the blade using the jig.

    Wesley

    #123433
    David Gill
    Participant

    @daveg

    I have the DMT diamond stones but as Dave above says the flattening of chisel backs and irons is best done using sandpaper on flat glass, not only is it quicker but will ensure your diamond stones last longer for sharpening

    Wigan, Lancs. England :

    #123440
    mike melendrez
    Participant

    @melendrez

    I second what Dave says. Many times I have had to start out with 80grit wet and dry sandpaper on a flat tile. Once the tool was close then I moved on. Don’t give up keep working at it.

Viewing 10 replies - 1 through 10 (of 10 total)

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