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  • #26856
    emilio.remogna
    Participant

    Hello, I’d like to share a detail of one of my little projects.
    It is a dovetail box.

    Well, I don’t like metal hinges so much… And generally I prefer to keep the lid and the bottom of a box symmetrical.
    So the problem was finding a solution to house a part of the lid in the box.
    I thought: “A rabbet!”; but the thickness of the wood was the same for the lid and for the bottom. A rabbet would have made the rounded part of the lid too thin.
    So… I added the feet for the lid. These feet allow to house the lid and are a sort of “peculiarity”.
    What do you think about?

    Thank you.

    P.S. I’ll finish the box with a paint made with beer and natural pigments. Beer is an ancient medium and natural pigments can be mixed to obtain your own color. Then solid wax to protect the wood. I’ll post the result.

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    #26864
    Dave Riendeau
    Participant

    Emilio, nice addition. Check out Japanese toolboxes on google. They have some ingenious ways of adding self locking sliding lids to boxes. I’m in the process of making some little boxes myself and will use pins instead of hinges.

    -Canada

    #26868
    emilio.remogna
    Participant

    Thank you, Dave. You gave me a very, very interesting hint.

    And I’d like to share this link: http://pfollansbee.wordpress.com/2013/01/13/wooden-hinges-for-a-joined-chest/.

    #26879
    DeniseG
    Participant

    Great work Emilio. And thank you for posting a link to Peter’s hinges.

    i'd prefer to make it myself

    #26922
    emilio.remogna
    Participant

    Thank you, Denise, for encouraging me.

    #26953
    emilio.remogna
    Participant

    Hello, I’d like to show you the result. I’ve used a mixture of beer and “Green Earth” pigment to paint the box. (http://www.webexhibits.org/pigments/indiv/overview/greenearth.html) Then, brown wax and neutral wax to finish the surface. No sand paper. Green Earth pigment doesn’t hide so much and the color is not so uniform; the effect is a feeble, irregular glaze. But I think is warm as well. Sorry if the light is not so good (cold light bulb).

    Attachments:
    #26966
    Greg Merritt
    Participant

    I like the way it looks Emillio. I’ll read up on that finishing technique. Although it may hurt me a little to use my beer for this.
    Well done and thanks for posting.

    http://hillbillydaiku.com

    #26971

    Thanks for posting Emilio, very interesting project)I can be wrong but is the wood for your project is pine? It looks like a pine before you applied finish, but at the end it look like white oak)
    Thanks again for posting)

    Toronto, Canada

    #26975
    emilio.remogna
    Participant

    Greg, I found this technique in a book, but, more or less, it’s like the one described here: http://pierrefinkelstein.com/2013/01/18/beer-glaze-or-reversible-glaze/
    I think that another advantage of this old technique is that, while preparing the paint, you can… have a sip of the “solvent”! 😉

    Serhiy, the wood for the project is pine.

    Thank you.

    #26977
    Greg Merritt
    Participant

    Thanks for the additional link Emilio.

    http://hillbillydaiku.com

    #129790
    Salko Safic
    Participant

    It looks like it’s burnished thanks for the link.

    https://journeymansjournel.wordpress.com
    The Lost Scrolls of HANDWORK
    (Hand tool only woodworking magazine)

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