First Project

  • Creator
    Topic
  • #57202
    Salko SaficSalko Safic
    Participant

    This is my first ever project with masterclasses online, raising the panel is a bit of an issue for me. When I installed the rails it actually cracked it and therefore bulged out. I didn’t rebate the back I followed Paul’s method but I didn’t get the sweet angle so the raise itself is what cause the crack. I went ahead and planed it some more but I over planed it so now the panel itself is loose and wobbly within the grooves, I believe glue will fill that gap up but it’s not ideal. Nxt time I’m going to make a rebate but for this clock having raised panel on both sides is ideal.

    Can anyone tell me exactly how I can get the correct angle without this happening again.

    Anyway I plan on making another one after this is one is complete out Fijian Mahogany.

    I would like to point out that scribe you made works excellent, I do own a 1/8″ bead moulding plane. Haaving compared the results between the two your methods beats it hands down. It is definitely quicker with the moulding plane but less attractive. Btw I used a phillips heads screw and it works well, it actually compresses the fibres and very slightly rounds one half. Not sure why you don’t recommend using the phillips head.

    I would like to finish off by saying having worked with wood for a number of years doesn’t make me an expert by any means and by joining masterclasses my skills already have improved greatly whilst learning something new. This is the best investment I have ever made. So thank you Paul!

    https://journeymansjournel.wordpress.com
    The Lost Scrolls of HANDWORK
    (Hand tool only woodworking magazine)

    Attachments:
Viewing 15 replies - 1 through 15 (of 21 total)
  • Author
    Replies
  • #57205
    Greg MerrittGreg Merritt
    Participant

    @gman3555

    Salko your clock looks great. Fit the panel as Paul shows in Episode 3 of the Wall Clock series. At the end of that video Paul is fitting the panel by planning away the back surface. Using a check block that has the same groove, keep planning and checking until the test block groove bottoms out on the panel edge. You want the panel to float freely in the grooves. The trick is to sneak up on the angle that you are planing on the back surface. Ideally you want the panel to bottom out in the groove but still just touch the front and rear edge of the groove. This allows the panel to float side-side and up-down but does no rattle front-back.

    To tighten up your current panel try folding one or more shavings around the outside perimeter. Test it. Once your happy with the fit glue the shaving to the panel and let it dry. This will leave you with a panel that still floats.

    Hope that makes sense and helps you in some way.

    http://hillbillydaiku.com

    #57223
    Salko SaficSalko Safic
    Participant

    @salko

    That’s a great idea Greg. Iniitially where I think I stuffed I measured it incorrectly by not placing rail flush with the stiles so the panel was too long. After cutting it I had to replane it and for whatever reason it was always too long then I ended up cutting it stoo short. I don’t really know what happened there I know I was frustrated with it because I’m doing this project in between my work projects and I just wanted to get it done. Everything still fit’s except for the looseness front to back which that shaving trick will do.

    https://journeymansjournel.wordpress.com
    The Lost Scrolls of HANDWORK
    (Hand tool only woodworking magazine)

    #57226
    Greg MerrittGreg Merritt
    Participant

    @gman3555

    Glad to help Salko. I pulled that from the ‘been there, done that file’. 🙂

    http://hillbillydaiku.com

    #57236
    Salko SaficSalko Safic
    Participant

    @salko

    Firsty thank you Paul I’m not sure if you read these posts but your a genius just take a look at that round over, you would never believe it’s done by hand it just looks too perfect for that but it has been. Another new skill attained again the best investment I have ever made.

    Let me add this rounding it over with a plane or router takes about the same time I honestly don’t see the difference since I’ve done this round over with a router countless of times but it’s the sanding that’s time consuming.

    https://journeymansjournel.wordpress.com
    The Lost Scrolls of HANDWORK
    (Hand tool only woodworking magazine)

    Attachments:
    #57267
    Denise GaulDeniseG
    Participant

    @deniseg

    Salko, Great work. Wasn’t the clock fun to make. I loved the practice on round overs and raised panels and plowing a grove for the panel. Your round over looks amazingly good.

    i'd prefer to make it myself

    #57268
    Salko SaficSalko Safic
    Participant

    @salko

    I love making clocks but then again that’s what I do for a living but I’ve never done a raised panel nor a round over by hand before. I’m still not confident doing a raised panel since I stuffed the first one up. I’m not sure how I stuffed up on the measurements but it ended up being too long so I cut it to length and re planed the edges and that’s where I got into trouble. I went plane crazy like a barber who gives you a crew cut when you simply asked for a trim. The mitres didn’t meet so I kept planing till they did end result not a snug fit.

    But I’m doing another one when this ones done. I’m doing this clock in between other projects so it’s going rather slow at the moment. I think I will skip the bottom bun and edge moulding and leave that for the second clock. But definitely yes I am having a ball and I haven’t touched a power tool yet.

    https://journeymansjournel.wordpress.com
    The Lost Scrolls of HANDWORK
    (Hand tool only woodworking magazine)

    #57274
    David GillDavid Gill
    Participant

    @daveg

    Hi Salko
    Clock looks great Greg’s advice sounds good to me.
    I also found the making of the raised pannel a bit of a chalange and had
    posted the following in an earlier post 19881

    Two clocks nearly finished (Not Glued) One to go.
    I have found for me it is easier to produce the raised panel by holding it horizontally in the vice not vertically.
    I also found that it was easier to use a block plane when going across the grain. I also marked a number of lines for each of the angles, working to 1 line at a time until reaching the final finished bevel

    Wigan, Lancs. England :

    Attachments:
    #57278
    Salko SaficSalko Safic
    Participant

    @salko

    Yep did the same except for the 3 lines, what does the first two lines represent. I went as far as using my skewed rabbet plane and made a fence for it. Finally in the end I ended up back to the no.4 as this was the easiest method of them all.

    It’s amazing how we all think alike and yet were literally 20.000 km away.

    https://journeymansjournel.wordpress.com
    The Lost Scrolls of HANDWORK
    (Hand tool only woodworking magazine)

    #57283
    Salko SaficSalko Safic
    Participant

    @salko

    Well I guess this is the last of the work in progress pics the next one will be the finished piece.

    As you can see I chipped the inside, better inside than out but it didn’t have to happen had I been paying attention. I let the glue dry for too long while I was attaching the top. Lesson learned. The last pic was a solution to the loose panel simple wedges that are glued in place. Now if I were selling this clock I wouldn’t be selling it in this condition, I would of remade the panel. As for the rail chipout I would be stuffed here and I guess here is another lesson we should all consider. If I used hide glue I could simply heat it up and pull it apart and make another rail but with modern day glues you don’t have that option. Maybe it’s time I start looking into it.

    https://journeymansjournel.wordpress.com
    The Lost Scrolls of HANDWORK
    (Hand tool only woodworking magazine)

    Attachments:
    #57298
    SandySandy
    Participant

    @sandy1man

    The clock looks good. Keep at it. Practice and experience perfect the craft!

    Good decisions come from experience. A lot of experience comes from bad decisions!

    Insanity: doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results.

    Albert Einstein

    #57299
    Mark ArmstrongMark Armstrong
    Participant

    @nobby1967

    Salko We all make mistakes. We normally learn from them.
    The outside finish dose not look to shabby at all well done. 😉
    I have seen what you have put on the gallery here and there is some impressive stuff I must say.

    Dagenham, Essex, England

    #57304
    Salko SaficSalko Safic
    Participant

    @salko

    Thank you Mark and Sandy wise words indeed

    https://journeymansjournel.wordpress.com
    The Lost Scrolls of HANDWORK
    (Hand tool only woodworking magazine)

    #57371
    David GillDavid Gill
    Participant

    @daveg

    Salko
    I found by having the three lines on the face and the edges I could ensure I had the angle planed correctly before moving on to the next lines I could sneak up to the final lines giving nice sharp parrallel angles.

    What type of clocks do you make for a living, is it the clock cases or the mechanisms

    Wigan, Lancs. England :

    #57381
    Salko SaficSalko Safic
    Participant

    @salko

    I make wooden clocks of all types, some scrolled, some not I’m going to start carving them as well. I don’t use mechanical movements mainly due to huge costs involved I try and keep the costs down as much as possible to make them affordable for everyone which is why I only charge for labour and actual material cost. The labour charge is actual working time not meal breaks which I rarely take nor scratching my head trying to figure out how to approach a certain task.

    Your approach is interesting but I fail to see how the two lines in between aid you since your going to plane them down while you approach that sweet spot where it fits snuggly in. I don’t know how those two lines will aid you as an angle finder unless your lines extended down the ends of the board and you drew them as rabbets like you would when using a moulding plane. Then again you could just simply just draw the rabbets and then rabbet down to those lines and then hit it with a plane. Wow so many ways of executing a simple operation yet I stuffed it up in the end. lol

    https://journeymansjournel.wordpress.com
    The Lost Scrolls of HANDWORK
    (Hand tool only woodworking magazine)

    #57384
    Salko SaficSalko Safic
    Participant

    @salko

    This is a test piece I’m going to apply to my clock, it’s amazing just how good shellac can be. I have literally spent hundreds of dollars on many different types of oils, poly’s, mixing my own oils, stains I mean the list is just too extensive. I have experimented with so many different applications chasing to achieve certain levels of sheen and gloss effects. This to me is quite attractive, the picture doesn’t quite give it justice and to think that it is possible with shellac on it’s own is quite amazing and the fact that I have able to achieve this in only half a day and then left to dry overnight is the fastest method I have ever come across. With Shellac on it’s own I am able to achieve different levels of gloss and sheen as I desire without having to resort to spraying, what a wonderful product I can’t believe I have neglected it for so long.

    I believe I truly am at my final stages of experimentation I have an array of finishes just sitting on my shelves, under the work benches that are failed experiments, marketing bollocks at it’s best and will end up in the bin. My choice of finishes now is shellac and oil. My only last stage is to to mix my own batch of danish oil, I want to try to use shellac as a varnish in the oil maybe a 3lb cut or less not quite sure and I also want to mix a batch using minwax semi gloss fast drying and compare the results between the two. This would be it after that there will be no more experiments.

    Has anyone discovered something new in their finsihes I would love to read about it.

    https://journeymansjournel.wordpress.com
    The Lost Scrolls of HANDWORK
    (Hand tool only woodworking magazine)

    Attachments:
Viewing 15 replies - 1 through 15 (of 21 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.