Hand Saw Restoration

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    Topic
  • #126206
    Matt McGrane
    Participant

    I picked up this 8 tpi, 16″ blade cross-cut Warranted Superior saw for $3 at a garage sale last weekend. It needed a fair amount of work. You can see how rusty the blade was, but I got it fairly clean with a citric acid bath, followed by sandpaper and steel wool. The handle was very dry and a bit dirty. I scraped all of the old finish off, sanded, and applied a couple coats of boiled linseed oil. Not sure what wood it is, but it had a reddish hue in spots after scraping. Looks stunning after oiling. I also cleaned up all the saw nuts and that made a nice difference, too.

    The teeth needed some work. When I was jointing them to get them all to the same height, I realized they needed more work than I though. So I completely removed the teeth and filed new 8 tpi teeth (first time ever). It’s two days later and my fingers are still buzzing. This is only the second time I’ve tried sharpening a cross-cut saw. I re-watched Andy Lovelock’s excellent video tutorial on “Sharpening Western Saws” and took notes before attempting this. I filed with 14° rake and 20° fleam (I sound like a pro, don’t I?) using a little wooden guide to help with the angles. The teeth aren’t perfect by any means, but I got a very nice cut in both pine and maple.

    Just below the teeth, the blade is about 0.040″ thick. I set the teeth to about 0.048″. This 0.040″ plate seems thick for a short 16″ saw. Anybody know what this saw was probably used for? I’m guessing it’s a panel saw, but I would have thought the blade would be thinner.

    Matt, Northern California - Started a blog in 2016: http://tinyshopww.blogspot.com/

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Viewing 7 replies - 31 through 37 (of 37 total)
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  • #126769
    Marilyn Moreno
    Participant

    @mmoreno610

    Hi @mooncabbage,
    Just read your response above. It’s kink, a bend at the top of the saw blade. You can see it when you eye along the blade from heel to toe. My technique is decent as after sharpening it for the 1st time it cut pretty straight and I didn’t steer away from the line. I tried doing the bend by grabbing it from handle to toe and it took out some of the bend, but some of it is still there.
    Is there anything else that I can try to straighten it further?
    BTW, I hang it on a wall for storage.
    @patrickwright, I’ve not heard of the boiling water remedy. I’ll look into it.

    Marilyn - Lehigh Valley, Eastern Pennsylvania - USA

    #126770
    Mooncabbage
    Member

    @mooncabbage

    Just to be clear, a ‘kink’ is where the saw is straight, bends at an angle, and then goes straight again. A bend is a gentle curve the length of the blade. The bending trick isn’t really to fix kinks so much as to test the quality of the blade steel.

    To fix a kink, you can try hammering it out by gently tapping the affected area between a large hammer in the vice, to act as an anvil, and another hammer. Don’t whack at it, that much force isn’t necessary. You need to imagine that the bend has stretched the steel on one side of the blade. You can’t easily shrink the steel back, but you can stretch the steel on the opposite side to take the kink out. You probably won’t be able to get it back to new, but you might be able to make it useable.

    Another option, depending on the location of the kink, is to shorten the saw. If the saw is a full length 26-28″ blade, you could take anything from 4-8″ off of it and still have a serviceable saw.

    #126771
    Marilyn Moreno
    Participant

    @mmoreno610

    @mooncabbage,
    It’s a kink, not a big one, which is probably why I can saw pretty straight. Unfortunately it’s mid blade, so shortening is out of the question. The kink is at the top edge and not along the teeth.
    Don’t have an anvil, so I’ll try to work something out with the vise and a couple of hammers.
    Thanks.

    Marilyn - Lehigh Valley, Eastern Pennsylvania - USA

    #126914
    ejpotter
    Participant

    @ejpotter

    I have gone through this search for saw nuts myself, repeatedly. Here are some affordable solutions that you might consider:

    – buy nickel-plated saw nuts from Amazon.com: http://www.amazon.com/Great-Neck-Hand-Replacement-Screws/dp/B000G33PA8

    – buy 1″ furniture binding screws from big box store. These are often brass-plated steel, so look fairly nice, if non-traditional. They tighten using hex wrenches on either side.

    – go to your local Habitat for Humanity ReSTORE (or other second-hand goods place), and buy crummy and/or worn-out saws (usually $3-5) and salvage the saw nuts. Nice traditional saw nuts can often be obtained this way.

    – if you’re in the UK, or don’t care about shipping costs, you can get reasonably priced brass or brass-plated saw nuts here: http://www.flinn-garlick-saws.co.uk/acatalog/Saw_Screws_.html#SID=432

    Just moved to NE Ohio

    #126923
    Mooncabbage
    Member

    @mooncabbage

    Thanks for the great links Mr Potter! I will say that Furniture Binding screws don’t do the job. They were the first thing I tried, and they just don’t grip strongly enough. Second hand saws in Oz don’t typically come with good saw nuts, having already been filched, or the saws being riveted instead.

    The amazon replacement screws look great. And they come in a 10 pack! I’ll see if they ship to Australia, otherwise would an American perhaps be interested in sponsoring a group buy?

    Last but not least, the Garlick & Sons link is a gold mine! It even says right on there, that shipping is reduced if you only buy nuts AND they have solid brass ones. The only potential issue is the shape of said nuts is a bit unusual. For 2 pound per fully brass nut, plus whatever shipping is, I can’t complain.

    In summary, I love you Mr Potter, please marry me.

    PS. Amazon do ship to Australia, so I’m ordering 20 of those screws, cause they’re cheap. Might still get some brass ones but I’m happy for now.

    #126997
    ejpotter
    Participant

    @ejpotter

    @mooncabbage, glad I could help. Honestly, I didn’t like the furniture screws either, although I have seen some saws where they worked/looked nice. Unfortunately, I don’t have any near-term travel scheduled to Oz, so the wedding will have to be postponed.

    Just moved to NE Ohio

    #127002
    Mooncabbage
    Member

    @mooncabbage

    Got a reply back from the Flinn Garlick people, said the postage would be about 6GBP, which is not a lot. Might be an interesting option for people looking for low cost brass saw fixings.

    @ejpotter That’s ok, my GF probably wouldn’t have approved anyway.

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