Japanese saws

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  • #7985
    juryaan
    Participant

    I recently received this set of japanese saws.

    After seeing some you tube video’s of people using this type of saw and ofcourse having a tool adiction i just wanted to try them out myself.

    I must say they need some practice since they cut on the pull instead on the push stroke and it takes a little longer to saw something , they are about 18 tpi,but they do leave a nice surface wich don’t need much planing.

    Holding the saws was very strange in the beginning but now after a few days they just feel (for me that is) more natural than the western type saws.

    The reason for this post is, since many of us (me included) are on a budget i wanted to show that there are more options than just the western type saws,and this set was reasonably priced, i payed 80 Euro’s for the 3 saws.

    I hope this wil help some people.

    Here is where i bought the set http://fine-tools.com/set.htm

     

    Lopik - Netherlands

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    #7988
    Ken
    Participant

    Thanks juryaan, nice post. I have tried these saws and they must be great for those that like them. I could never get on with them my self,that could be down to my love of western type saws though.

    I like the fine tools site thanks for the link. 🙂

    #7996
    juryaan
    Participant

    Your welcome Ken.

    Lopik - Netherlands

    #8096
    Florian
    Participant

    Hey Juryaan,

    as far as I know the budget japanese saws are mostly induction hardened and you can’t resharpen them. The more expensive ones can be sharpened but cost comparingly to higher level western saws. What about yours?

    I bought a similar set of two saws (fine backsaw plus the doublesided) when I started to work wood also from Dieter Schmid (fine-tools). In soft woods and for finer work I like them a lot. I cut all my dovetails with the cheap japanese backsaw and the cut is very fine.

    I find that a deep knifewall is worse for the fine saw than just a knifeline. What I couldn’t do at all is ripping through thicker stock. It starts well but than the saw gets stuck because it has too little set probably.

    I like both types and I don’t think that you have to decide. I didn’t saw worse with the western after cutting with the japanese and vice versa.

    Florian

     

    I enjoy working wood in Germany.

    #8101
    juryaan
    Participant

    Hey Florian, i have the budget japanese saws,on the site they even recommend not to buy the more expensive ones when you are a beginner with japanese saws.

    I haven’t tried ripping thick stock , but the advice is putting a little wedge in the sawcurve so it opens up slighty. Wil try that soon.

    I stil use my western saws for the harder woods but i reach for the japanese ones more and more,i really like them.

    Maybe in the future i wil try a japanese style plane,these are simple looking planes but can produce the finest shavings.

     

     

    Lopik - Netherlands

    #8102
    Florian
    Participant

    I would like to make myself some of those Krenov-style planes one day. Have you ever tried the european wooden planes? In Germany you can buy them extremely cheap on ebay like the ones from ulmia or ece.

    I didn’t have a scrub until a few weeks ago. Then I was in Obi (home depot) and found a pretty solid looking but not nicely finished plane for 18 Euro. It was sold as a Jack (Doppelhobel) but what made me take it was its huge mouth opening that was like of a scrub. The real German Jack has a pretty thin opening and is not made for taking off a lot. Well, I took it home, flattened the sole, rounded the edges, marked a radius on the blade, ground it with sandpaper and after one hour it was ready to go. The radius was far from perfect because I did it freehand. If you never used a scrub before – like I did – it was an incredible experience. Very thick but very crisp shavings. It’s a beast ;-). You can reduce the width of a 6 foot long board by 3 inches in a matter of minutes and it’s fun! The astonishing thing for me is that although the blade seems to be of pretty soft steel what made the grinding and sharpening so quick, it stays sharp very long.

    On the very first day the experience was not only positive. On my other planes I like to play around in the corpus with my fingers to take out some shavings that have got caught there. On my other planes the mouth is very thin…

    With the index of my left hand I reached through the corpus came out on the underside without noticing and on the way back I cut half  of the fingers end. I have seldomly seen so much blood in a short time 😉

    I enjoy working wood in Germany.

    #8114
    Steve Follis
    Participant

    Thanks Florian for the testament.  OUCH!!

    Working at a Steel Mill, we are constantly preaching work saftey.  I am glad to see Paul mention it multiple times in his videos, as he practices it.  I have watched many videos of guys using power tools with the guards off and telling you not to do that at home.  I shaved off the end of my left thumb a few months ago on a table saw, I am lucky to have kept the rest of it.

    We have a saying at the Steel Mill;  “Don’t ever stick your finger where you wouldn’t stick your _____.”  (intimate & personal body part)

    Memphis, Tennessee

    #8115
    Ken
    Participant

    Hey guys, take It easy, you need to be able to order 10 drinks at the bar 😉

    #8125
    juryaan
    Participant

    I would like to make myself some of those Krenov-style planes one day. Have you ever tried the european wooden planes? In Germany you can buy them extremely cheap on ebay like the ones from ulmia or ece.

    Hey Florian,no i have never tried one of those planes,i also like the Krenov-style planes(David Barron makes these type of planes and sells them for a reasonable price(for new wooden planes that is reasonable i think).

    I also like the planes from HNT Gordon in Australie ,Scott Meek in the USA,and Philly Planes in the UK ( i have a tool problem i know) but these planes are pretty expensive,they are about the same or higher priced than the standard iron premium planes.

    Who knows,maybe some day….

    Lopik - Netherlands

    #8126
    Florian
    Participant

    Stephen, I know ;-),

    the first thing that came to my mind was “don’t forget we are working with supersharp tools…” by Paul Sellers.

    Ken, I am happy I still can order the ten drinks 😉

    By the way Stephen, if you work in a steel mill – do you make your own blades?

    Juryaan, I guess most of us have a little tool problem. My present one consists of looking for a set of woodturning tools for a lathe that is not yet finished… 😉

    I enjoy working wood in Germany.

    #8128
    Steve Follis
    Participant

    Florian,

    No, I don’t get to make my own blades here.  However, I do get to pick the brains of the Metalurgists here and get some pretty useful information from time to time.  If you have any questions about Iron or Steel properties, I can probably get some decent answers for you.

    Memphis, Tennessee

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