Making A Bead

Viewing 14 posts - 1 through 14 (of 14 total)
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  • #3989
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    I have always loved the look a simple bead can give to a project, and before joining here, I would have been ordering a beading bit for the router, or looking for a beading plane.

    After seeing Paul make the bead on the clock case, I though wow I will have to try that. Well no bit of scrap is safe anymore I’m putting beads on it all, HaHa so simple but so effective, it’s amazing. It probably  means nothing to you guys that have been working wood for years, but for us beginners, just learning something new is a great joy.

    Cheers

    Ken 😉

    #3991
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    I sincerely think it’s great witnessing such enjoyment being garnered by you and others as you enhance your skills my friend.  It’s much the reason I’ll never become disenchanted with woodworking and why I always offer encouragement whenever I can. 🙂

    #3998
    juryaan
    Participant

    Hi ken,

    nice bead, gonna make myself one soon.

    [off topic] do you use that N0 6 plane for smoothing or for rough work?

    Lopik - Netherlands

    #4000
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    Thanks guys, juryaan I use it after the N05 for levelling  and straitening the surface. I then set the blade for a finer cut, and do what I call Intermediate smoothing.

    #4003
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    I totally miss read the title initially and my Geordie translation had me thinking you were making a bed as your next project. 🙂

    #4004
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    HaHa 🙂 I like it buddy

    #4005
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    😉 😀 Funny thing is it’s true lol 😀

     

    #4007
    jonkilleen
    Participant

    My fleaBay no.50 combination router arrived this morning.  Looks good. Been making lots of beads so far, unfortunately I’m not yet at the point of skills development where I’m able to keep the bead attached to the wood it’s cut from ;o)  Is it still called a bead when it’s on the floor with the rest of the shavings?

    Yorkshireman currently living in Hampshire

    #4008
    Ron Harper
    Participant

    Ken,

    one of the major attractions of this addiction, is that every day in the shop brings with it the potential of the thrill of new discoveries and gained skills and knowledge.

     

    Ron

    #4035
    Charles Cleland
    Participant

    I’m with you Jon,  my Stanley 45 came in the mail a few days ago.  Grooves are getting better (especially after installing a deep fence), beads are still a little rough.  I’ve been practicing on scrap though, and not much of that is the clear straight grain I would pick for intentional molding with this plane.  Fun shavings to make though!

    Washington State, USA
    My own humble blog:
    http://toolsofourfathers.wordpress.com/

    #4038
    jonkilleen
    Participant

    Hi charles. The deep fence is definite the way to go.  Lots more control. Sharpened the cutter, and having reviewd a couple of vids on youtube, managing to cut some decent grooves and shoulders. Know what you mean about using scrap though, chipped the corner off the 3/16th cutter on a knot and had to resquare and sharp the edge. You live and learn i guess!

    Yorkshireman currently living in Hampshire

    #4041
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    Nice knowing your #50 arrived safely and great seeing loads of practise going on Jon. 🙂

    Here’s a couple of handy tips

    Sharpening with a single bevel at 35 deg tends to be the (Manufacturer’s) recommended angle, plus provides a more resilient edge for when you hit stubborn timber. 😉

    Select stock carefully for grain orientation and knots.  Knot free, straight grained timber tends to produce the best results.

    #4042
    jonkilleen
    Participant

    Thanks Gary!

    Yorkshireman currently living in Hampshire

    #4053
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    No probs Jon 😉

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