More Resawing cupped boards

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  • #13223
    Ken
    Participant

    I have spent most of the day, ripping boards down the middle, so I can plane them up and glue them back together. I have made my mind up, that buying planed timber is a big waist of time and money. I should have bought rough sawn timber in the first place, and it is half the price.

    If I plane them flat without ripping I loose about 10 mm in thickness, the ones I have ripped and glued back together, I have only lost about three mm.

    So rough sawn boards from now on. Happy days. 😉

    #13275
    John Poutier
    Participant

    Ken – how are you ripping the boards? I have a bunch of previously used oak boards that I would like to rip and plane to useable dimensions. Are you doing it all with hand tools or are you in the “machine tool” side of the shop…which for me would be the same spot in the garage with a tool that I plug in!
    Cheers,
    John

    Yorktown, Virginia

    #13281
    dborn
    Participant

    I’ve do that too. But sometimes as I’m ripping the boards I wonder why I bought cupped boards in the first place….lol the cupped boards I bought have beautiful grain patterns.

    #13283
    Ken
    Participant

    Ken – how are you ripping the boards? I have a bunch of previously used oak boards that I would like to rip and plane to useable dimensions. Are you doing it all with hand tools or are you in the “machine tool” side of the shop…which for me would be the same spot in the garage with a tool that I plug in!<br>
    Cheers,<br>
    John

    John, I’m doing it all with hand tools buddy. My workshop is a unused spare room. 🙂

    #13284
    Ken
    Participant

    I’ve do that too. But sometimes as I’m ripping the boards I wonder why I bought cupped boards in the first place….lol the cupped boards I bought have beautiful grain patterns.

    Dan, my boards were nice and flat when I bought them. They seem quiet stable once they have been ripped and glued back together. If I’m going to have to do that every time, I might as well buy rough sawn boards.

    Cheers

    #13303
    dborn
    Participant

    Oh, the lumber I bought that way was rough sawn and air dried. one of the boards I ripped in half and will use the two separate boards for different projects, instead of gluing back together.

    #17046
    Xavi Molina
    Participant

    Hi guys. I have a question for all. (Excuse me, but I did not express very well English.) I have some wooden pieces of 50X75 millimeters from a previous project. How can be cut into pieces of 10×75 millimeters with handsaw?. This is very easy with a bandsaw, but I find it impossible to do this with a hand saw. There is some technique that makes this possible? I’ve tried with Japanese saws, but neither.
    Thanks for your help.

    Musician and wood lover (Girona-Catalonia)

    #17066
    humanic
    Participant

    Hi,

    I’m ripping boards down the middle and very small thickness using usually with a shop made frame saw. It’s fast, secure and acurate. I prepared for you an explanatory report into the attached image. I hope this helps.

    Best regards from Catalonia,

    –Óscar

    With love, best regards from Catalonia.

    Attachments:
    #17080
    dborn
    Participant

    I use an EC Emmerich frame saw for ripping boards. I clamp the board to my bench, strike I line, start the cut with a smaller saw and then go to work saying the board. Push the saw to a 45° angle and the saw cut more aggressively, tilt the more vertically and its easier to adjust the kerf. My shoulders get a good work out, but its a fun task.

    #17105
    Philip Adams
    Participant

    I would use a normal ripcut panel saw if I didn’t use a bandsaw, which would waste less material) and leave a bit of margin for error in case you go off you’re line. One of those things that you get better at the more you do it, as well as building up the muscles after all that ripping (-: Frame saw looks like a good idea as well, especially those with a deeper blade.
    Phil

    I work alongside Paul to plan and produce the videos for Woodworking Masterclasses

    #17111
    humanic
    Participant

    Thanks to all for your kind comments about the frame saw technique.

    Cutting wood with a hand saw has more to do with breathing that muscular power, and using a frame saw adds precision to equation in some type of cutting work.

    I’m considering seriously the making of a frame saw with two or three blades to cut some slides simoultaneously, somethin that a regular panel rip saw can not do. Yes, it can be an extravagant method but considering how our foolish world runs it can be better to build it and send all band saws to some countries of Africa to use its engines to build fountains for pumping of potable water for its poor inhabitants.

    Slightly off topic, I’m here not exactly for the woodworking love. I’m here mainly for the exeptional vision of a man, Paul Sellers, who bring us another point of view about the craft and the hand work of wood in special. I love the apparent simplicity of its methods and its advocate for the poor man tools. Progressively, our need of paceful and fulfilled work will be incremented in our decadent western world full of machines arround.

    I guess you can judge me as an excentric man, and yes I’m. I was trained as a programmer, dealing with computers and automatic machines for more of thirty years now, and yes again, I have some kind of irregular pattern, perhaps like some of you, in this excentrical hand woodworking forum, an strange island into the machined woordworking world of today.

    “As machine become more and more efficient and perfect, so it will become clear that imperfection is the greatness of men.” –Ernst Fisher.

    Love and best regards from Catalonia,

    –Óscar

    Side note: Programing computers can be an art 😉

    With love, best regards from Catalonia.

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