Ohio Tool Plough Plane Rehab #2

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    Topic
  • #126249
    Matt McGrane
    Participant

    With the dilemma of several damaged screw-arm threads behind me, I’m turning my attention to some stripped out screw holes. In the picture the screw I’m holding is pointing to the hole that it goes into to lock the depth adjuster, which is just above that. It’s more of a machine screw than a wood screw and it’s got an unusual size – approx. 1/4-18. I believe the hole was originally tapped so that the locking screw simply threaded through the wood to lock the depth adjuster.

    That hole is almost completely stripped out and it is slightly conical, with the hole getting larger at the outside My question is: is there a good way to repair the hole so that I can use the original thumb-screw to lock the depth adjuster?

    In a related issue, the wood screws that attach the screw arm assemblies to the fence are also screwed into holes that are somewhat stripped and I need to tackle those, too.

    The info I’ve found on the internet talks about gluing into the hole some toothpicks or matchsticks. I’ve tried that on some scrap, and it might work, but it seems so hokey.

    I guess I could also try a larger size thumb-screw, but I’d really like to use the original. Any ideas?

    Matt, Northern California - Started a blog in 2016: http://tinyshopww.blogspot.com/

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  • #126302
    dborn
    Participant

    @dborn

    What about gluing plugs or dowels, then drill into the the plugged hole and retapping the threads? I’ve done this with a door in my son’s room and also a picture frame I added legs that were bolted on and made to swivel… Both worked just fine.

    #126328
    Matt McGrane
    Participant

    @mattmcgrane

    @dborn – Thanks Dan. That’s one of the solutions I’ve been thinking about. I think I’ll practice on some scrap before I work up the nerve to try it on the plough plane.

    Matt, Northern California - Started a blog in 2016: http://tinyshopww.blogspot.com/

    #126375
    dborn
    Participant

    @dborn

    Just remember, you will have to drill that hole slightly bigger to ensure you have clean wood for good wood on wood bond.

    #126414
    Matt McGrane
    Participant

    @mattmcgrane

    Well, I went for it and it worked fine. I plugged the existing hole and re-drilled for the depth adjuster locking screw. The locking screw threaded fairly easily into the new wood and holds the depth adjuster quite well. The first picture shows the new plug with locking screw in place.

    Once I put the plane back together and tried it out, I realized the iron was not seating properly on the skate. So I had to file down the skate a bit. Second photo shows my first try at grooving a board. Not bad, but I can tell this plane will take some practice to get good with it.

    The last photo shows the (almost) completely restored plane. The only part I haven’t done anything with is the wedge. But that needs work, too, and maybe I’ll try making a new one later. Looks like it was tapped with a hammer several times too many.

    Now if I can only find some reasonably priced irons …

    Thanks to all who commented and gave suggestions on this restoration.

    Matt, Northern California - Started a blog in 2016: http://tinyshopww.blogspot.com/

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