planning pressure treated lumber

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  • #11628
    Ken
    Participant

    Some Info for a question asked in another thread.planning pressure treated lumber

    Recycled Lumber Workbench

    Do not leave any shavings or pieces of that pressure treated wood in contact with the plane after using it. From what I’m hearing,the newest stuff is not very friendly to iron or steel, it corrodes it. I can see a tiny shaving getting wedged somewhere in the frog or under the cap iron, causing a bit of rust or heartache if it sits there for a few months. So, clean the tool once you’re done.

    http://woodworking.about.com/od/safetyfirst/p/SafeACQLumber.htm

    #11630
    cpetersen1970
    Participant

    Thanks, Ken.

    #11631
    Steve Follis
    Participant

    Hey Chris

    I have built a lot of stuff with Pressure Treated Lumber, but I have come to a point where I don’t like using it. Even though the chemical has been changed out from the old Arsenic that was once used to a Chromated Copper Arsenate, I am not convinced that it is safe for extended handling. I have limited my use of the material to things that won’t be handled, like the floor joists, floor, and sill plates of a storage building. If I do handle it, I wear a dust mask when sawing, and make sure I wash my hands and launder my clothes right afterwards. That may sound a bit paranoid, but that chemical never just fades away, once it is introduced into a location, it has to be removed to get rid of. I have used it for playsets and swings in the past, but I don’t like the fact that kids will have their hands all over it while playing.

    If it were me, I wouldn’t use it for my workbench.

    As far as outdoor projects, I use either Western Red Cedar, or Cypress to take advantage of their natural preservative properties.

    Memphis, Tennessee

    #11632
    Simon
    Participant

    Thanks Ken, very interesting and useful advice.

    Likewise Steve, I totally agree I can’t imagine those chemicals are all that nice if your in contact with them over a long period of time. I watched a vid on Youtube a few months back because I realise I didn’t have a clue how they made PT wood, very eye opening.

    DaddyChief.com - Welcome to my randomly scatty brain....

    #11633
    Mark Armstrong
    Participant

    Not nice stuff at all. Have used plenty of the stuff over the years. Washing hands is a must. Dose not plane that nice either.

    Dagenham, Essex, England

    #11635
    lwreinhart
    Participant

    Ken, thanks for the info! I’ve never used the stuff and from what I’ve just read I never will.

    #11636
    Steve Follis
    Participant

    Another thing to be aware of, if you are handling wood from pallets, or shipping crates, look for the IPPC logo if it has one, see attached picture. This indicates that the wood has been treated for insects, so they won’t be transported from one location to another. If you see “HT” on the label, it was Heat Treated, and is safe for handling or breathing. If you see “MB” it has been fumigated with Methyl Bromide. I would leave that alone, again more chemicals that are suppose to be safe, but I don’t trust it for woodworking, burning, or extended handling.

    Memphis, Tennessee

    #11641
    cpetersen1970
    Participant

    Appreciate all the input, gentlemen. I believe I will attempt to reclaim some non PT lumber if possible or buy new if I must. Thanks again, everyone, very helpful.

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