Saw Horse Design & Build

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  • #3445
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    Concerned in case my post count offends others, I thought it may prove best if I begin a fresh thread concerning a saw horse build I carried out a couple of days ago.  The design is one I’ve worked from since before apprenticing as a cabinetmaker almost 45 yrs ago and – although basic – is adaptable to suit most purposes via the addition of tool tray, holes for holdfasts and planing stops and inlet hand holes for use when carrying.

     

    It seems a fairly recent trend has arisen for naming pieces similar to this as saw benches and not saw horses, but – regional semantics aside – either name can be used for these low cutting platforms, whilst taller versions tend to be called trestles (Either folding or fixed frame) and more commonly used as temporary worktop/platform supports.

     

    Here’s a picture of the part completed piece. 🙂

     

     

     

     

    #3450
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    Thanks Gary, it really is appreciated nice job buddy 🙂

    #3455
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    I’m hoping it at least helps someone Ken 🙂  The track of thought I’m following concerns those without work benches and how it’s possible – before aiming for a complete tool kit – for them to become involved in woodworking with minimal financial lay out and equipment.

    In this instance, the tools involved were;

    1.  7tpi handsaw (My outdoor kit tends to involve using throwaway saws and cheap chisels) – Spear & Jackson “Predator” 1st Fix

    2.  Adjustable square – 12″

    3. Sliding Bevel – 8″

    4. Tape measure

    5.  Smoothing plane – #4 Stanley or #04 Record

    6.  Claw hammer – 20 oz

    7.  Bevel Edged chisel – 1″

    8.  Pencil & / or Marking Knife

     

    Additional Tools if prepping rough stock

    1.  Jack Plane – #5 Stanley / #05 Record with cutting edge set to an 8″-12″ radius

     

    Additional Tools – if adding an optional V-shaped crotchet for use when door hanging and/or sawing length-wise on the saw horse

    1.  Bit Brace – I tend to prefer a 10″ sweep when drilling heavier stock, but use whichever size sweep you prefer

    2.  Auger bit – 1-1/4″ dia

     

    Materials

    1.  Pine – 6″ x 2″ PSE (Planed Square Edged)

    2.  Pine – 3″ x 1-1/2″ PSE

    3.  PVA – Outdoor grade

    4.  Nails – Round/Oval Headed @ 2″ x 8 Qty

    #3458
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    In terms of the build in question I used;

    1.  Pine – 3″ x 1-1/2″ rough

    2.  Pine – 6″ x 2″ rough

    3.  Nails – Oval 2″ @ 8 Qty

    4.  Polyurethane Glue (I’d ran out of PVA external grade and am awaiting re-supply from my ex-works)

     

    #3471
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    I’ve just attempted to share a Sketchup drawing here, but security protocol disallowed it.  If anyone with Sketchup would like a copy just pm me and I can send via email.

    #3529
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    Sketchup drawing 🙂

     

    Failed to upload again lol

    #3534
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    Got it Gary, many thanks buddy 🙂

    #3537
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    Nice one Ken 🙂  I’ll post a few pic’s of the completed saw horse once I’ve nabbed the connection lead from daughter number three 😀

    #3539
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    Pictures of completed sawhorse 🙂

    #5 WS jack plane and rip saw were placed in an attempt at providing a sense of scale 🙂

    #3545
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    Nice job buddy. I’ll order two please 😉 🙂

    #3546
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    Would that be with or without champagne rack and bespoke speaker system? 🙂

    #3557
    Ron Harper
    Participant

    I like this one. I have a pair of them. Used them a lot today.

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    #4361
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    A very useful saw horse Ron 🙂

    All I can add concerning saw horses regards the detail surrounding stretchers/bracers applied as supports for the legs.  They honestly don’t need to be as robust in section as the legs and can be made using 1-1/2″ x 1″ stock or take the form of 1″ dowel (Through mortised into and pegged/foxtail wedged to retain them), threaded bar, or even rope because their primary task is to prevent the legs from splaying further apart when under load.  Lightweight diagonal bracers can also be used in place of their lateral/longitudinal counterparts.

    In essence, saw horses don’t need to be heavily braced as long as joints and fixings are tight and adequate bracers are fitted when needed for heavier work loads.  I prefer to them to be comparatively lightweight and capable of being stacked.  Longitudinal leg splay tends function best if their feet terminate on the same plain as the top and this prevents problems with tipping whilst in use and makes the top capable of carrying a full loading at any point along it’s length. 🙂

    #4437
    kelly
    Participant

    Because I don’t yet have a work bench, I like Ron’s bench.  It is more of a “bench” rather than a “horse” (IMHO).  I consider it to have additional functionality to the more standard “horse” design.  But I plan to build something similar to both designs.

    The additional functionality in Ron’s would be to use it as a mini workbench by sitting on the piece being worked or, using dogs with wedges or, hold fasts.

    I like and see a use for both designs.  In fact, I’m planning to incorporate several different design elements when I build mine.

    Here are some of the resources I’m getting inspiration from.

    https://www.evernote.com/pub/scroggik/woodworkingsawbench#b=df962ba4-cb6e-499e-9f00-cd1926ffd18e&st=p&n=7ee543f1-8410-4311-8a51-7fbb308d1a5f

     

    Texas, USA

    #4447
    Ron Harper
    Participant

    I really like this design. I have two of them. I use one for mortising also. very handy gizmos

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