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Sharpening Milestone

This topic contains 38 replies, has 24 voices, and was last updated by  rickcorradini 4 years, 7 months ago.

Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 39 total)
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  • #57120

    Greg Merritt
    Participant

    @pigiron I would recommend the diamond stones over the water stones. I’ve had both and find the water stones require too much maintenance and are troublesome to use. With the diamond stones I just pull them out when I feel I need to sharpen, sharpen and then put them back under the bench. In a couple of minutes I’m done. I also strop on leather as my last step in sharpening. I firmly believe that I could function just fine with the medium and fine diamond stones plus the strop. Eze-lap sells a double sided diamond stone and Paul wrote a blog entry on it here.

    http://hillbillydaiku.com

    #57123

    bubba1
    Member

    I have round heels when it comes to sharpening systems. I Have most of the systems; many of the honing jigs, including Eclipse and most of the Veritas jigs, along with oil stones, water stones, ceramic stones, diamond plates, granite plate and sandpaper, machines include Worksharp and Tormek T-7 with both standard stone and 3000 grit Japanese water stone, and for my way of working (that is the key phrase) a freehand convex bevel on diamond plates and a strop charged with Herb’s yellowstone works best.

    I also maintain a stropped convex bevel will give a better working edge than any other type or method. This based on many experiments using all the different methods and bevel types. Over the years when I’ve run into difficult wood I will dig out many of the systems to see if I can get a sharper edge and/or one that is more durable. I keep hoping but it never happens.Sometimes the machine or jig sharpened edge with a micro bevel will feel a little sharper the first cut (debatable) but by the second and third there will be little or no difference after that the micro bevel edge will begin to break down and fracture. The stropped convex bevel will remain sharp and working much longer. This result is the same for any of the major tool irons and brands, O1, A2, PM-11,Japanese White Steel, it makes no never mind. YMMV

    #57125

    Sandy
    Participant

    I used both methods for a while. Hand sharpening and then using the guide to correct my errors. But I’ve found that I use the guide less and less as I get more proficient in sharpening to a good angle and a square face.

    While I have never used a water stone for sharpening woodworking tools, I do have the diamond plates and have no complaints about them. 3 plates and a strop with Wood River chisles and There has never been an edge problem in any kind of wood.

    Insanity: doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results.

    Albert Einstein

    #57126

    pigiron
    Participant

    Marilyn and Greg, thank you so much!!! I just entered my order for an EZE-LAP 3 x 8 fine stone. Can’t wait to see how well I can do with it. If my hobby allowance doesn’t get curtailed for some reason, I’m targeting next month to order the coarse stone too.

    #57127

    pigiron
    Participant

    Thank you too, Sandy.

    BTW I’ve copied the Einstein quote from your response for future use.

    #57133

    Sandy
    Participant

    Pigiron, You are welcome to it. That is one of my favorites.

    Insanity: doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results.

    Albert Einstein

    #57146

    Charles Hart
    Participant

    I am all for the easiest method that gives me the best results. I recently bought 2 DMT diamond stones and right now I am unsure asz to there honing capabilities. I used them on a new #4 I bought and I just don’t feel like it’s sharp as when I used water stones. Don’t get me wrong I want to move to the diamond stone I just don’t know if I’m getting the sharpness I was getting previously. So how do I get out of the sharpening question and address my plane which won.t cut a full shaving width. I just sharpened it did all the realignment issues to get the blade straight and tracking true. Can someone point me in the right direction.

    Chuck Hart in Renton Washington USA

    #57150

    Franco
    Participant

    Before wood working, I used oil-stones for sharpening kitchen knives and scissors etc, and although I got decent results, I never achieved a really sharp edge. I used them dry, as this seemed to be better (allegedly) due to the pores not becoming clogged. I also had a spell with water-stones.

    It wasn’t until I started using the diamond stones that I started getting the results I wanted. I can now get a very sharp edge on my chisels and knives in a matter of minutes. I don’t use guides, and although I’m still not as fast as I’d like to be without risk of destoying the squareness of the blade, I can get the sharpening done and back to my project in no time.

    It seems this subject could be toiled over and analysed ad nauseum in some cases: micro-bevels, perfect angles, this system, that system, but in honesty, with just three diamond stones and a bit of leather, I’m good to go for the next few years. All with no mess and very little maintenance.

    #57151

    pigiron
    Participant

    Thanks again, everybody. Sounds like there’s a learning curve to using a diamond stone…especially if one is already used to the wet stone method. Maybe since I haven’t done any sharpening yet I will find “the groove” quicker since I won’t have to change any habits. Can’t wait to receive my new EZE-LAP diamond stone and start in on my plane iron and cheap chisels.

    #57337

    Marilyn Moreno
    Participant

    @pigiron
    You’re welcome…
    One of the things I noticed and I know someone mentioned in an earlier blog is that when new, the diamond stones seem to have some residue. The first few times I used them, it felt like they were leaving these marks on the chisels. I wish I could remember which blog to point you to.
    Anyway, don’t be discouraged by that when used at first. I’ve noticed that in the last weeks while sharpening, my chisels are looking better and there’s way less of that residue on the diamond plates.

    P.S. I’m new to woodworking and so reading through many of the questions that come up here has helped with my own concerns and abilities to work on wood. I practice, and with each try I see improvement in technique..

    Marilyn

    Marilyn - Lehigh Valley, Eastern Pennsylvania - USA

    #57339

    pigiron
    Participant

    Hi Marilyn,

    I remember on the back of my EZE-LAP package they warned that a new stone would feel much coarser at first, and that with use, it would quickly “settle in” to how it should feel. I have a very old chisel that must have been used to destroy concrete or something. It was in very bad shape. Well, I decided to practice on it with my new fine stone before trying my good ones. I rubbed and rubbed and it finally began to get sharp. My new stone has “settled in” quite well now. It only took a few strokes to sharpen my newer cheap chisel. Looks like I’m on my way. EZE-LAP is a great product. Might make the super-fine my next addition.

    #57344

    Marilyn Moreno
    Participant

    Looking forward to my Superfine purchase as well. I made a diamond plate holder ala Paul Seller’s style and I have this empty slot carved out waiting for this last plate.

    Happy Carving!!

    Marilyn - Lehigh Valley, Eastern Pennsylvania - USA

    #57346

    pigiron
    Participant

    Marilyn,
    I made one too. I chiseled out a single rectangle in which my only 3×8 stone sits–right in the middle. I only have knife walls marking the other two spaces. How deep did you make yours, and do you plan to use an adhesive? Mine fits tightly, but it wouldn’t take much for it to fall out. I was thinking about using rubber cement or something like that. Something not so permanent.

    Thanks

    #57351

    Marilyn Moreno
    Participant

    @pigiron,
    I used 2 sided carpet tape to hold them down. That’s working well. I used plywood. So what I did was cut several grooves with miter saw so that the rubber legs make contact with the board at the bottom of the groove. I cleaned out the corners of the grooves with chisels, which was a workout on plywood.I left the center section intact for each plate to touch the board. The plates sit nice and snug and the 2 sided tape holds them in place along the center of each plate.

    With the 2 sided tape you can pry them off if you need to.

    Marilyn - Lehigh Valley, Eastern Pennsylvania - USA

    #57353

    Ron Harper
    Participant

    I too had a bunch of stuff before I encountered Paul. i now use 4 stones. Extra coarse diamond, coarse diamond, hard arkansas, and extra fine transcucent arkansas then strop. I use the extra coarse very rarely. Ifind that water stones do not work well with Paul’s honing method. It is my experience that very quickly I outgrew the need for a guide. The use of a guide is just enough hassle to discourage honing.

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