Sketchup Model for the Chest of Drawers from "The Joiner and Cabinet Maker"

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This topic contains 3 replies, has 2 voices, and was last updated by  Salko Safic 3 years, 2 months ago.

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    Matt McGrane
    Participant

    A few month ago I read the Lost Art Press (LAP) book “The Joiner and Cabinet Maker” and really enjoyed it. As part of the book, Chris Schwarz gives his account of building the projects.

    While I have no plans (at least not right now) to build any of the three projects from the book, I wanted to create a Sketchup model of the Chest of Drawers in case I decided to try it later. I contacted LAP about whether or not I could offer my Sketchup model to others and they said it was OK. Since I contacted them, they offered their own Sketchup models of the projects from the book. For the chest of drawers, there are a few differences between their model and mine and I’ve done my best to have everything correct. I have a little info on my blog that outlines what is different between the two models, in case anybody is interested.

    Now, if I can just figure out how to attach the model here …

    Matt, Northern California - Started a blog in 2016: http://tinyshopww.blogspot.com/

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    #137471

    Salko Safic
    Participant

    Hey buddy how you doing. If you’ve read my earlier post on 3d modeling you would know I’ve been a huge advocate for it but, recently in the last couple of months I’ve been moving away from it. I no longer feel it is a necessity in the craft. I feel it’s more to show the clients what the finished product will look like rather than it being any kind of an aid to the woodworker.

    I think I need to explain myself a bit here and clarify an important point, I don’t believe it does aid the hand tool woodworker, for machine based work it can as they are setup to do multiple exact replica cuts and joints and so forth. Even then it really isn’t necessary at all, you know I draw everything up in cad but all those measurements I draw up can ever be absolutely executed spot on to that in every part. We aren’t machines so we cannot think nor work like them and that’s why I feel that 3d modeling other than viewing the completed project cannot aid the worker. I also feel that sketchup really isn’t a sophisticated software but rather inventor professional if we are going to go down that road is but unfortunately the learning curve is huge and even though I started and now stopped learning it I will restart it again only really for the sake of having one more skill under my belt and besides you never know what the future holds. There are many jobs in engineering firms one could get by knowing inventor but not a single job out there for sketchup. I know Bob Lang is a huge fan of sketchup but it’s not for me.

    https://journeymansjournel.wordpress.com
    The Lost Scrolls of HANDWORK
    (Hand tool only woodworking magazine)

    #137472

    Matt McGrane
    Participant

    @salko – Hi Salko. Hope all’s well down under. I agree that hand tool woodworkers don’t really need something like Sketchup. I would never use it to try to make all my parts to the exact dimensions in the model. As a hand tool worker, you really need to get many of your final dimensions from the actual work pieces, like fitting a divider between two rails or something.

    But I do like Sketchup for organizational thinking. I can get a good overview of the piece. I know how many parts I need and can figure the amount of wood to purchase. More importantly, I can work out the joinery. I know I could do all this on paper, but I was never any good at drawing things out on paper, so this is a good option for me.

    Matt, Northern California - Started a blog in 2016: http://tinyshopww.blogspot.com/

    #137473

    Salko Safic
    Participant

    Yeah everything is ok just plotting along, you know I still haven’t made those moulding planes. I bought the timber but just cannot find the time I keep saying after work I’ll do it but comes 5:30 and I start cleaning up I just don’t have the energy the drive is there but the energy is depleted.

    I suppose if you want to see how all the parts fits together meaning to check if your drawing is accurate which is the reason I got into it but as you said you measure each part of each other. I don’t know, it’s a good concept but many have taken it overboard thinking this is a must have, your woodworking experience will be so much simpler and I too fell for it but realised it’s nothing more than another marketing ploy to get you to believe it’s something you need when you actually don’t. You know what I mean that’s just that one more conveyor belt thing that Paul’s been talking about. At first I never understood it but now I’m starting to and infact I’m going to do a blog on the explanation of this conveyor belt. All these softwares are a deception Matt, can you imagine what would happen if all the power went out and no one could use computers and even mobile phones, there would be mayhem for a while. But think back when you were a kid we never had computers nor mobile phones what did we do then. I think we would be much better off and for the sole reason that we can’t control ourselves. We live on these damn machines and slave for it rather than it working for us. I’ll do a blog soon enough.

    https://journeymansjournel.wordpress.com
    The Lost Scrolls of HANDWORK
    (Hand tool only woodworking magazine)

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