Stropping compound

Viewing 8 posts - 1 through 8 (of 8 total)
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  • #315945
    Ricky Briggs
    Participant

    Hi Guys,

    This is my first post and wanted to know what Paul uses to rub onto his leather stop. Also as I intend to make one, does anyone know which side of a strip of leather is best to strop against….. the smooth side or the rough side?

    Thanks for your help,
    Regards,
    Ricky.

    #315948
    Chris Wood
    Participant

    Hi,
    When I made mine I used the rough side of the leather. The stropping compound I purchased is green and was described as being of ‘fine’ consistency. Any good tool store sells this stuff for buffing wheels etc.
    Regards,
    Chris Wood

    #315958
    Ricky Briggs
    Participant

    Thanks Chris.

    #315959
    Dave Ring
    Participant

    The green compound sold at Harbor Freight works well. Look next to the sandpaper.

    #315961
    Arthur Coates
    Participant

    For the most part, I use the following compound on a 2×4 of almost any non-open-grained wood that has been planed or sanded flat:

    The surface left by 80-100 grit sandpaper is ideal. It also helps if the wood is slightly warm before applying the compound.

    Also, for smaller tools or oddly shaped ones, I make strops out of scraps with curves and shapes suited to the object to be sharpened.

    The biggest mistake I make is that the compound picks up grit and bits over time and begins to leave coarse scratches. Be sure to scrape it down and apply fresh compound when this happens.

    Where leather strops really come into their own is in the practice of straight razor shaving – when the edge is so thin and keen that the act of stropping on the leather will “realign” the “crumpled” edge of the blade.

    #316785
    Ricky Briggs
    Participant

    Thank you all for taking the time to reply.

    #316804
    norman jansen
    Participant

    I think I’ve heard him mention in one of his videos he uses Chromium-oxide to charge the strop.

    Myself I use a pink compound, used for polishing stainless steel. No idea what it is (as it’s pink, I suspect aluminium-oxide, but not 100% sure), but it works fine. I’ve used liquid metal polished too in the past, and that worked as well.

    The actual compound you use isn’t that critical, I think. If, after 30 (not 29! not 31! 🙂 and yes, I always count them) strokes the bevel is polished then one can reasonably expect the compound to be suitable.

    #316852
    David B
    Participant

    I got a gigantic block of the green stuff he uses on Amazon for like $10 or something.

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