Tear Out

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  • #4389
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    Hi guys,

    I had some nasty tear out around some knots in the timber I’m planing up. I don’t have a cabinet scraper as yet, so I ended up using a stanley blade.

    It worked really well, I would not like to try doing a large area with it, but for around the knots it done the job. 🙂

    Ken 😉

    #4395
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    Hi Ken 🙂

    Test drive a Stanley or Record #80/080 and you won’t regret it my friend 😉

    One little trick (Yep superglue again 😀 ) we sometimes use when dealing with troublesome knots involves flooding the knot with superglue and zapping it with accelerator.  This tends to lock the knot and it’s fibrous surroundings in place while a finely set plane is able to smooth straight through it.

    Another trick involves the use of circular planing motions over and around the knot and this method can tend to deal with the contrary grain involved.

    #4396
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    Thanks Gary. HaHa I was just looking at the #80 It’s my birthday next week, I mite just treat my self 🙂

    Cheers buddy 😉

    #4399
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    No probs Ken 😉  Sounds like a plan 😀

    I’ve just been playing with my son’s new (ish) Stanley Premium #4 & #62 today and they’re not bad at all for the money.  Although the Norris style adjusters felt a little fiddly to adjust I think they’d be pretty easy to get a feel for. 🙂

    #4401
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    stanley cabinet scraper no. 80
    Gary, what’s the best one to go for new or old

    #4402
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    Both old and new are pretty much the same Ken, but at least you get a new iron when buying new, plus the irons are pre-ground at 45 deg and ready for burnishing.  Once the hook is formed (Optional as it will work without a hook), you simply pop the iron into the stock (Frame) while it’s base rests on a flat surface and allow the iron to make contact with the surface beneath.  Lock the iron into place using the two side screws, snug up the central screw and adjust depth of cut by tightening or loosening the central screw.  They’re a breeze to set up and use. 🙂 😉

    #4403
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    It is cheaper to buy the new one’s, but some think the old one’s are more robust. I see the Veritas iron also fits the No80

    Thanks buddy 😉

     

    #4404
    Dave
    Participant

    I struggle with mine.  I’ve been trying and trying to get the edge rounded over correctly.  When I try to use it, the scraper tends to really bite hard and it take a great deal strength to push it or the thing just produces sawdust.  I’m trying it on pine and am wondering if the type of wood makes any difference.

    I’ve been watching Pauls DVD on sharpening these and obviously he has a very attuned skill for for sharpening these but I cannot even come close to what he does.  Every other tool he demonstrates sharpening I can get results but these scrapers, boy is it frustrating.  I’ll have to buy another blade soon due to the amount of filing I’ve done and I havent even used it on a project yet cause I can’t get the thing to work  lol.

    -Canada

    #4405
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    Never a problem Ken 😉  I’m only too pleased to help.

    The original irons work fine, but never any reason not to invest a fresh iron by Veritas 🙂

    #4406
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    Dave I found this, I hope it helps

    #4408
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    Probably best to go for a new one Gary, always nice to have a spare iron I think.

    Think I will order one on Monday, I’m going to blame you though HaHa 🙂

    #4414
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    I’ve broad shoulders Ken 😉 😀

    ————

    Hi Dave,

    The information Ken linked you to should help resolve any issues you have.  Initially, I’d tend to ease off the pressure at the centre of the blade and hold the blade slightly more upright.  Both adjustments (Simultaneous or one at a time) will help reduce cut aggression, as you seem to be successfully sharpening the iron.  😉

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