Things that I am learning

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Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 17 total)
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  • #19420
    Steve Follis
    Participant

    Attached is a picture of my latest adventure. It is a set of outdoor furniture made from African Teak (Iroko). Two gliders, two footrests, and a side table. Although the bulk of this work is done with power tools, and there is not much “Joinery” involved, there is a lot of challenges with the angle and curves in the furniture.

    As I am going through the process of designing, modifying and building, I realize more and more how much I have learned over this past couple of years since I bought Paul’s book, DVD’s, and then joined the Woodworking Masterclasses. I have learned how to keep my chisels sharp and pick them up and use them more frequently than ever before. I use them mostly for fine tuning or shaping boards, or cleaning up glue. I don’t spend nearly as much time trying to make a jig for a specific angled cut, I just mark out where to cut and pick up my handsaw and get it done accurately and much faster. I don’t go set up my table saw or chop saw any more if I only have a few boards to rip or cut, I use my handsaw instead.

    Since I don’t have a jointer, if I had a twisted board in the past, I would set it up on a sled and shim it so it wouldn’t shift and then run it through my planer. That is a lot of trouble and kinda risky if the board decides to shift. I now take my hand plane and take the twist out of one side of the board and then flip it over and run it through the planer. It is much faster, more accurate, and safer.

    I have over 100 hours in this set of furniture, and although I sold it for a fair amount, I don’t think I collected even minimum wage for my time. That will only improve over time, and I am finding that a good set of hand tool skills makes me much more efficient, than just using power tools alone.

    I have learned a lot from the series and also from all the articles and comments made from the other members, and for that I am very appreciative. You guys keep me motivated too, with all your inspirational work and efforts.

    I am trying to build up enough business that I can semi-retire with in a few more years. It is a lot of work, and I have a ways to go, but I am enjoying the journey.

    Thanks Guys!

    Memphis, Tennessee

    #19424
    Ken
    Participant

    Good job Steve, way to go buddy. 😉

    #19426
    Greg Merritt
    Participant

    Very nice Steve! The chairs look very inviting and comfortable. The simple cobbled together adirondack chair has come a very long way. I agree that hand tools can be much more efficient in many instances.
    Again, well done!

    http://hillbillydaiku.com

    #19428
    STEVE MASSIE
    Participant

    Very nice indeed Steve, great job. I agree with your assessment on what you have learned from Paul’s Book ( I have not bought any DVD’s yet but want to ), joining Woodworking Master Classes and following Paul’s Blog. I have learned so much and have all most given up power tool’s except for the occasional use of my Band Saw, Shopsmith ( primarily for the Drill Press feature ) and my electric drills.

    I enjoy using Hand tool’s immensely though I still have a lot to learn and practice with not to mention it is great exercise. My #4 Bedrock has become my favorite plane along with my 1″ chisel. I am still learning how to sharpen my saw’s but that is another story.

    That set you made looked really really nice.

    Thanks for sharing !

    Steve

    Steve Massie, I live in the great State of Florida, US

    #19431
    Steve Follis
    Participant

    Thanks guys, it is a whole lot of work, and a whole lot of pleasure!

    Memphis, Tennessee

    #19432
    David Gill
    Participant

    Nice set Steve, It looks very inviting to sit by the pool in the chair with feet up on the foot rest and a drink on the side table, I think i could put up with that for a few hours
    Good job

    Wigan, Lancs. England :

    #19433
    david o’sullivan
    Participant

    really beautifull steve

    "we can learn what to do, by doing" Aristotle

    #19436
    Mark Armstrong
    Participant

    They look really comfortable very nice design well done Steve.

    Dagenham, Essex, England

    #19442
    Steve Follis
    Participant

    Again, thanks guys!

    Next week, I get to do it again! Cypress this time, 4 chairs, 3 side tables, and 2 footrests.

    Memphis, Tennessee

    #19451
    dborn
    Participant

    Wow! I am amazed at what people can do here! Great work Steve!

    I am barely a year into wood working and I am simply amazed as to what what I have learned. I’m glad I found Paul Sellers on you tube before i spent my kids college fund on a hobby, i just wish I had found him before I started any woodworking because of what i have learned and the skills gained from working with hand tools. I’m glad to be a member here!

    Thanks for the post Steve and keep up the good work!

    #19454
    David Gill
    Participant

    Wow Steve that sounds like some project, will you be posting photos of the build in progress

    Wigan, Lancs. England :

    #19470
    Steve Follis
    Participant

    David, I will post a picture when I am done, but this kind of work that I am doing is different from what we are learning here from Paul. It is a lot of power tool work. What excites me about this whole process is how I am able to start using more handtool skills to compliment what I am doing with the power tools. What used to be a challenge with bandsaw or table saw, is not much easier with a handsaw, chisel or plane. A lot of the “problem areas” I am finding it much faster, accurate, and safer to fix with the handtools as well.

    Memphis, Tennessee

    #19472
    Mark Armstrong
    Participant

    Keep em coming Steve. 😉
    There is a place for machinery even the best furniture makers have machinery.
    For getting your stock to rough size they are handy things to have.
    Sometimes though its quicker to do by hand.
    Little example couple of weeks back I had to fit some Ikea wardrobes for my boss they were a tad to tall for room. I set a couple of stalls up eyeballed 5/8″ and used finger as guide for pencil drew line got hand saw and cut sides and plinths for each wardrobe to length.
    My boss said why did I not use circular saw. I said its quicker by hand by the time I set up a batten or guide clamp I would have cut by hand also I can work right side up and it makes less dust and mess.
    Sorry Steve for my little hijack.

    Dagenham, Essex, England

    #19482
    Scott
    Participant

    Very cool Steve. I’ve never been a fan of the Adirondack chair until I recently sat on one that was particularly comfortable. Yours look comfortable and easy on the eyes. Well done.

    I see some extra substructure under the chair that I have not seen before in an Adirondack chair. It is hard to make out because that area of the photo is a bit dark. Could you explain what that is for?

    -Scott Los Angeles

    #19483
    Steve Follis
    Participant

    Thanks Scott, the chairs are actually gliders, what you see is the glider base. Here is another picture that shows it a bit more clearly, also one without the glider base.

    Memphis, Tennessee

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