Tips and Tricks

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Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 19 total)
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  • #4823
    Mexiquite
    Participant

    Howdy!

    Greetings from San Antonio Texas!  If any of y’all are close by we should get together and do some woodworking.

    I wanted to start a new topic so we can share cool tips and tricks on how to do woodworking.

    One trick that I recently learned from Paul while I was taking his month long course was using superglue on knots so that they don’t bleed. He used a superglue (AKA CA glue which is ethyl 2-cyanoacrylate) accelerator which instantly cures the glue so you can work it. Well I just learned that you can also use baking soda instead of the accelerator to instantly cure the superglue.

    So that is my tip of the day. More to come.

    Caleb

    #4825
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    Hi Caleb 🙂

    Greetings from County Durham, England 🙂  (Doesn’t have quite the same ring to it, but I tried. lol)

    This is an excellent idea. 🙂

    TIPS

    1.  If you find superglue has clouded whilst setting, add a drop of fresh glue to the existing and you’ll find the clouding clears as the two (Old and new) amalgamate.

    2.  Acetone is brilliant as a releasing agent for superglue, but if you don’t have any handy you can use nail varnish remover (I’m in constant hot water with my wife and daughters for “borrowing” their’s. 😀

    3.  Baking soda/powder can also be used as a filler medium when repairing string slots in guitar nuts.  Pack the slot with BP and then drop fill with CA (Superglue).  It cures and can be filed to shape almost instantly, plus serves well until a new nut can be installed.

    4.  CA can be used as an invisible filler when repairing cracks in dark timbers.  Drop fill the crack/dent and allow to cure before filling/scraping flush with the surrounding surface.

    #4830
    Dave
    Participant

    Dumb question but what do you mean by “knots bleeding”?  I just thought they were a pain to smooth with a hand plane.

    -Canada

    #4831
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    There’s no such thing as a dumb question.

    Live knots still contain sap/resin and can weep or bleed if left unsealed.  They eventually dry (Becoming dead knots) and fall out of a board if left un-sealed.  Sealing and locking them into place also helps provide an advantage during planing, as it can help prevent/reduce splintering and damage to the surrounding surfaces.

    Skewing the plane (Often opting for a circular planing motion when surfacing) and ensuring it’s iron is freshly sharp and finely set also helps one deal with stubborn knots and grain. 😉

    #4863
    Dave
    Participant

    Thanks Gary, Is this something that has to be done for all knots in a board?

    -Canada

    #4865
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    You’re more than welcome Dave 😉

    Knots can be a problem is left unsealed beneath paintwork, as they can bleed and shrink back (Potentially fall out) if left unsealed.  A dab of shellac or a preparation known as “knotting” (Sold commercially in bottles) on each side of the knot helps prevent such problems. 😉

    You don’t necessarily need to treat each and every board – especially if they’re to be finished using lacquer, but it helps if you’re aware of potential problems and how best to treat them.  Dead/dried out knots tend to shrink back and work loose – often eventually falling out – and examples can be found in places such as outdoor fences and old tool boxes.

    #8251
    Mexiquite
    Participant

    Someone responded that lives in Texas. You called me from Boerne Texas and I lost your phone number. Will you call me back? 4698445793

    #13629
    Mexiquite
    Participant

    A trick for GLUE UP.

    I use shavings like Paul does to clean up most of the squeeze out and have now started using a damp rag to clean up the rest of the glue. It works like a charm. No more sanding or clean up after the glue is dry. Very nice tip an old woodworker gave me.

    #13630
    Ken
    Participant

    Thanks Mexiquite,

    Quick question dose using a damp rag not raise the grain?

    Cheers 😉

    #13631
    Mexiquite
    Participant

    If it was dripping wet, maybe, but just a damp rag doesn’t affect it. At least I haven’t seen any difference. Just really clean joints and no clean up after the glue dries 🙂

    #13874
    juryaan
    Participant

    Great tip Mexiquite,thank you

    Lopik - Netherlands

    #14446

    Another glue up trick for squeeze out is to cut the tip of a plastic soda straw at a 30* angle and to “scoop” up as much of the excess as you can than use the damp rag. Works great..

    If there is a excess of the excess, just snip off the end and continue.

    Located in Honeoye Falls NY USA. The Finger Lakes region of Western NY.

    "If you give me 6 hours to fell a tree, I will take the first 4 to sharpen my axe" Abe Lincoln

    #14447
    Mexiquite
    Participant

    I’ll have to give that a try next time. Thank you @Pheasantww

    #16535
    kelly
    Participant

    Maybe you could use this …maybe not.

    It’s a chart (table) showing the relationship between an imperial, fractional measurement and the metric equivalent. It also shows the decimal value.

    It’s just a simple html file. All text, no scripts. All self contained. Just download the html file and save it to your hard drive (anywhere you want). To use it, simply open it just as you open any file. I usually “double click” it.

    I’ve also uploaded a pdf version of it.

    kelly

    Texas, USA

    #16539
    Ken
    Participant

    Thanks Kelly, nice job 😉

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