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Tool Cabinet Wood types

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    Topic
  • #555288
    Daniel Perdisatt
    Participant

    Hi,
    I’m a very new to wood working and I have acquired a few hand tools, the basics lets say. I’m thinking of building a hanging tool Cabinet. Given that I am relatively new to wood working, I don’t particularly want to spent to much on a expensive wood type as it will be expensive to replace if or when I make a mistake. Could anyone suggest a good ‘easy’ wood type to work with that isn’t overly expensive? I have done some research and a lot of the articles appear to be from american sources, I’m living in Ireland and I can’t seem to source wood type they speak of, or it is a variant of a particular wood type.

    Any input would be very much appreciated.
    kind regards,
    Dan

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  • #555298
    Sven-Olof Jansson
    Participant

    @sojansson

    In North America poplar might be a compromise between price, quality, and ease to work on.

    I’ve never come across inexpensive hardwood in Europe, and therefore suggest Scots Pine (Pinus Sylvestris)from Northern Europe, or Siberian Larch.

    /Sven-Olof

    Sven-Olof Jansson
    London, UK; Cambridge, MA

    #555448
    btyreman
    Participant

    @btyreman

    try and get hold of joinery grade PAR redwood pine, it’s often the best and cheapest option, from my experience I’ve only ever found it at independent timber merchants, you will pay a premium at wickes/B&Q for it and it won’t be the same quality.

    Mistakes are going to happen by the way, best way to avoid them is to really step back and take your time, for me they always happen without fail when rushing or under pressure.

    If you want a cheap hardwood that’s easy to work I’d highly recommend tulip/poplar or ash, I can easily get hold of american ash and it’s cheap but more expensive than redwood pine.

    #555449
    MIKE OBRYAN
    Participant

    @obryan2579

    So I just finshed my tool/wall cabinet. Built from boxstore pine. The doors are poplar from a sawmill and maple ply from a boxstore. The drawer fronts and shelve fronts are walnut that my uncle gave me. Its a very ambitious and doable build. Just don’t rush it

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