Unusual (for me) chip breaker / blade system

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  • #702717
    Colin Scowen
    Participant

    My good lady wife obligingly purchased a large amount of wooden planes of varying quality and heritage for me at a village fete last summer. Quite a few of them have this unusual looking setting system for the chip breaker. I don’t think I am missing anything, because all of the planes with this design had the same design, there were none with anything extra. There is a couple of mil play between the screw and the blade, and all of the ones I have are the same, so again, it seems to be by design.
    I am assuming that you would set the screw so that when you mount the blade and chip breaker and wedge in to the plane, the action of setting the wedge would push the bottom of the screw in to contact with the blade. When you then tap the blade to adjust it, a final tap on the wedge would re-seat the chip breaker. What I can’t work out is how you would avoid having to reset the blade and chip breaker each time when you adjust the blade up.
    Does anyone have any experience using this type of set up?
    (I will clean the blade, chip breaker and screw, and put a reasonable edge on the blade just to see how things work, but it won’t be a high priority job.)
    Colin.

    Colin, Czech Rep.

    Attachments:
    #702792
    Gauvain
    Participant

    Hi Colin,

    Wish my wife would bring me back boxes full of old tools !

    This is a system I’ve seen on some French planes (Peugeot, Coulaux & Cie, Goldenberg), I think it was popular there at some time (I don’t know for other countries though).
    I happen to have purchased one last week, also within a box full of old planes.

    On mine, the screw is exactly the length of the “hole” in the iron, so once set the chipbreaker can’t bo back and forth.
    The screw is locked in place by a pin on the iron, and a hole on top of the screw. Yours should also have some feature that keeps it in place (maybe it’s the shape of the screw head that matches the cut in the iron).
    To set the chipbreaker you simply turn the screw to position it at your chosen distance from the cutting edge, and the wedge will press it firmly against the iron. So it should stay in place.

    Although I haven’t restored the plane yet, so I’m unable to tell you how well this system is working. (We’re also on a low priority plane here)

    Best regards,
    Gauvain

    Attachments:
    #702826
    sanford
    Participant

    Thanks Gauvain and Collin for bring this to out attention. I have never seen any thing like that before.

    #707837
    Colin Scowen
    Participant

    Not related directly to the unusual chip breaker, but from the same job lot of old tools, I was able to recondition a small scrub plane. I am pretty sure it’s over 75 years old, given the small eagle and swastika mark I found on it. I’m pretty sure that marque isn’t used much these days.

    Colin, Czech Rep.

    • This reply was modified 1 year, 8 months ago by Colin Scowen.
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