Wax on shellac approaches

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Viewing 9 posts - 1 through 9 (of 9 total)
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  • #8473
    Florian
    Participant

    Hello,

    Paul uses the shoe shine brush immediately after applying the wax with the steel wool.

    This is something I don’t completely understand because I always thought it is necessary to let the wax dry before polishing it out with a brush.

    Yesterday I finished a project and did it like Paul. The result is a bit like I expected it and I would guess that Paul’s result is different.

    Everything looks very nice but if I touch it leaves fingermarks. Than I take the brush and they’re gone but I’d suppose that Paul’s wallclock that he seems to carry from the castle to his home directly after waxing is not covered with fingerprints 😉

    Did I miss “let it dry for a week” in the video or is Paul using quick’n-dry-wax or, or, or?

    Florian

     

    I enjoy working wood in Germany.

    #8478
    Ken
    Participant

    Florian,

    See if this is of any help…………..https://woodworkingmasterclasses.com/topic/a-guide-to-furniture-finishes/

    #8489
    Florian
    Participant

    Thanks Ken,

    I just saw all the how-tos this morning. Thanks for that!

    The author of those articles writes about drying before brushing but since Paul seems to do it differently I was wondering.

     

    I enjoy working wood in Germany.

    #8694
    Gary Hodgin
    Participant

    It’s probably like about everything in woodworking: More than one way to do it. I allow the shellac to dry for at least a few (2-3) if possible and longer doesn’t hurt. I apply the wax with 0000 steel wool or a maroon synthetic pad. Let it set for a few minutes (usually recommended time is on can). I wait till I see a haze. Shorter time and I’m mostly removing the wax, longer time and the wax become too hard to buff. Normally when I’ve done it correctly, I feel a little resistance to buffing and then everything turns smooth and slick. I normally buff with a old (but clean) undershirt. I going to try Paul’s buffing brush technique next time.

    #9166
    Florian
    Participant

    Hey Gary,

    Sorry for my late reply. I should have tagged the notification button. I just saw it now. Mine is a very slow drying wax. It is dry now after two weeks.

    I enjoy working wood in Germany.

    #11705
    Paul Sellers
    Keymaster

    I started using a good quality shoe shine brush decades ago. The Kiwi brand is best because of the quality of the bristle. It’s soft and not too stiff and the work looks just lovely when its buffed out with rapid brush strokes. I do it pretty well straight after application as this evens out any unevenness before it sets and so the lustre is even too. Usually I leave the National Trust paste wax for about an hour before handling but then that’s it. I also use Trewax as a paste wax. This has a carnauba wax additive, which makes the surface a little harder and more durable. I cannot say I have seen this wax in the UK. I bought my tin from Aubuchon Hardware here in Upstate NY.

    #11914
    RL
    Participant

    I am just finishing up a hall table on which the finish is a blond shellac. This is my favourite finish- easy, quick, and beautiful. I use a cotton fad with felt stuffed inside, and a couple of drops of baby oil to lubricate the fad when it starts to stick. I sprinkle some 4F pumice on the veneer during the first session too.

    The two pictures were taken after and before I applied the shellac, involving three sessions of finishing of perhaps thirty minutes each. I started yesterday afternoon and finished today. I rub out the shellac after the first session, and after that I just keep polishing till I think it looks right.

    Once I have the top in place I’ll add a wax coat.

    I think one of the reason I love using shellac so much is that it provides a connection with the timeless techniques used by former craftsmen. Once I get out my old fad from its stained jamjar, mix up a new batch of shellac from flakes and denatured alcohol, roll my sleeves up and start the rhythm of the polishing, I am doing something that has been done for centuries. And you can’t beat the results. It’s also the most forgiving finish out there- it’s reversible and it’s hard to go wrong.

    #14517
    smfield
    Participant

    @richardleon; what is the 4F pumice for?

    Life is but a pile of wood waiting to be seasoned, dried, and formed.

    #14519
    RL
    Participant

    Hi smfield,

    The pumice acts as a gentle abrasive and helps to also create a fine dust which fills the pores. The result is a smoother, closed-pore look. Well worth the minimal extra effort.

    Richard.

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