What happened ?

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 23 total)
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  • #11804
    Martin Bargeman
    Participant

    Hi everybody, my first post although I have been a member for a few months.
    I have been making all Paul’s projects including the ones in the book and especially enjoy making tables so armed with my limited knowledge I have just finished a hall table in pine which has woodworking wise came out perfect, even the glue up was smooth for the first time ( I actually got organised first!).
    I done what I thought was a good preparation, sanding with 240 grit before applying Danish oil but after applying it, the finish on the table top has a couple of dark blotches! Is this just where the grain changes? I hear the term raising the grain but not actually sure what that means..Sorry for the newbie questions.

    Norwich, Norfolk, UK

    #11819
    robinhc
    Participant

    Sorry to hear the finish didn’t fall into place right away. Can you take a photo and post it? I have been experimenting with using a shellac sealer under danish oil. Is your danish oil clear or include a stain color?

    Robin HC

    Robin ... Richmond, Virginia, USA

    #11826
    Steve Follis
    Participant

    Hey Martin, welcome!
    When wood gets wet, it swells up a bit. So, after you have sanded your wood and you put a finish on it, this can swell the surface, or “raise the grain”. Just sand it smooth and apply another coat of finish. Sometimes I will intentionally raise the grain and sand it smooth prior to finishing, since the grain typically won’t raise a second time.
    If you want to see what the wood will look like wet without raising the grain, use mineral spirits.
    As far as botching, some woods are worse about this than others. Wood conditioners, or gel stains can help with this. I have not used Danish oil before, so I’m not much help there.
    Good Luck! We would love to see some pictures of your work.

    Memphis, Tennessee

    #11830
    Joseph Sellers
    Keymaster

    @bargey,

    I am not sure what is causing the blotches, as Robin said, a photo would help.

    Regarding raised grain:

    Grain raises when it gets wet. This means that a previously smooth surface becomes rough to touch after finish, or other liquid, is applied. This is mostly a problem if you are using a water-based finish. You may end up with a tiny bit of raised grain with an oil finish but I doubt this is your problem.

    #11831
    Martin Bargeman
    Participant

    Thanks for the replies everybody, Robin it was a Danish oil in a medium oak colour.. I will post some pictures later to show what happened, still happy overall..thanks

    Norwich, Norfolk, UK

    #11836
    Martin Bargeman
    Participant

    A couple of my small recent projects including my latest, the hall table. Be gentle fellas haha.

    Norwich, Norfolk, UK

    Attachments:
    #11840
    RL
    Participant

    Pine is a wood that is prone to blotching. I would sand down the top, apply a shellac sealer and then the Danish oil. Raising the grain should not be an issue here as you are not using water-based finishes.

    After the shellac sealer, lightly sand to remove any nibs.

    #11841
    RL
    Participant

    To add, the blotching is caused by some areas of the top absorbing more oil than others. You can reduce the amount of absorption with the shellac sealer coat.

    Personally I’d just go with a shellac finish all the way anyway. Blond shellac over pine always looks terrific.

    #11843
    Ken
    Participant

    Danish Oil penetrates the wood, It can’t do that if you seal the wood first.

    #11848
    RL
    Participant

    Ken, if you use a wash coat of shellac, enough oil will penetrate but not so much as to cause excessive blotching.

    #11849
    Ken
    Participant

    Ken, if you use a wash coat of shellac, enough oil will penetrate but not so much as to cause excessive blotching.

    Ok bud thanks for that. 😉

    #11855
    dpaul
    Participant

    Martin, your projects look great! I especially like you clock…what a great idea.

    D. Paul

    #11886
    robinhc
    Participant

    Robin it was a Danish oil in a medium oak colour

    That is what I thought. That is a finish and a stain combined in one, so the rules for staining pine apply. I have heard of a couple of options:

    Option #1 a pre-stain conditioner.

    I have not tried this but the concept is the conditioner is applied right before the stain. It does not seal the wood, just kinda pre-wets it so the stain soaks in slower.

    Option #2 sealer coat

    This is the one I have been experimenting with. I do not use regular shellac. I use Bullseye SealCoat. Sealcoat (2 lb. cut) is already half as concentrated as regular Bullseye shellac , but needs to be thinned even more for use under danish oil. I have been using a 50/50 mix but not much stain gets in. Here is a quote from Highland Woodworking:

    “Zinsser’s new Bulls Eye brand sealer is a 2-lb. cut of pure, clear, dewaxed shellac — so of course it’s imbued with more than a little magic. Dewaxed shellac is an ideal sanding sealer. It bonds tenaciously to virtually any bare wood or finished surface; it dries very quickly, sands smooth with the greatest of ease, and since it contains no stearates it provides a reliable base for any kind of finish going on top. Thinned with denatured alcohol (3 parts alcohol to 2 parts sealer), SealCoat works as an excellent pre-stain surface conditioner …CLICK HERE FOR MORE”

    SealCoat

    Option #3 gel stain

    Have not tried this one either. The basic Idea is the stain doesn’t soak into the wood hardly at all. just stays near/on the surface. I do not think a danish oil could be used as the finish though. The whole idea of danish oil is to soak in and give depth to the finish.

    Robin –> @bargey

    P.S. If you have some scraps of the same pine left over, I would experiment on those to get just the right look you are after.

    Robin ... Richmond, Virginia, USA

    #11899
    Martin Bargeman
    Participant

    Thanks for the replies everybody, and the clock was a easy project to practice my dovetails 🙂

    Norwich, Norfolk, UK

    #11904
    robinhc
    Participant

    There is a good article on working with pine in this magazine/book on page 120. You can buy it here:
    AMERICA’S BEST-EVER WOODWORKING PROJECTS & SHOP TIPS 2006

    Robin

    Robin ... Richmond, Virginia, USA

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