Welcome! Forums General Woodworking Discussions Woodworking Methods and Techniques What kind of joinery should I use for this section of a corner table?

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  • #309058
    Edmund
    Participant

    So my wife wants a small, 3-legged corner table for the guest water closet. She wants something along these lines:
    http://www.bobreuterstl.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/04/aruza-corner-accent-table.jpg
    (I’ll also attach the picture in case the link doesn’t come through)
    although without the scroll-worky piece up front.

    I’m mainly hoping for advice on the center section that houses the small drawer in the picture above. What kind of joinery keeps that section attached to the legs? Is that piece done “whole”, and then cut-outs are made into the legs? Maybe the legs are left “whole”, and the drawer section has a cut-out, but if that’s the case, how are the legs and the drawer section joined?

    Also, if there are better examples of such a corner table, which use better methods, please point them out to me — this is all new territory for me. Thanks

    • This topic was modified 3 years, 11 months ago by Edmund.
    #309079
    Sven-Olof Jansson
    Participant

    Bill Hylton’s book ‘The Art of Cabinet Making’ privdes half of the answer, and the remainder I think can be deduced. The top and bottom pie shaped surfaces, which also form the stretcher, are joined to the legs with use of loose tenons or bisquits. The two pies are held together by the vertical pieces next to the legs and the inset drawer, perhaps by tenons.
    /soj

    Sven-Olof Jansson
    London, UK; Boston, MA

    #309081
    Edmund
    Participant

    Thanks, soj

    I can’t find a book with that exact title, could it be this one:

    https://www.amazon.com/Illustrated-Cabinetmaking-Construct-Furniture-Woodworker/dp/1565233697

    ?

    #309083
    Sven-Olof Jansson
    Participant

    My apologies, Ed!

    Really not acceptable not to provide the full title or a link, but that’s the one. It will tell on which joint and why, but not how. In addition, one is provided with insights into North American furniture history, which, if nothing else, I’ve found beneficial as a subscriber to Woodworking Masterclasses. Though, I am not all that attracted to any of the many examples of furniture illustrated, the comments and exploded drawings have taught me a lot. Finally, Mr. Hylton has a nice prose, so perhaps I can justify having two copies of this book

    Sven-Olof Jansson
    London, UK; Boston, MA

    #309085
    Edmund
    Participant

    Many thanks, soj

    Loose tenons are probably a good idea…I’ve never used them, so a bit of practice is in order

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