Welcome! Forums General Woodworking Discussions Tools and Tool Maintenance/Restoration Wooden spokeshave – how do I sharpen the blade?

Viewing 13 posts - 1 through 13 (of 13 total)
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  • #25539
    nljsellers
    Participant

    I recently bought an old wooden spokeshave on ebay. The body/handles are in nice condition but I need to sharpen the blade. Flattening and polishing the bottom is easy enough, using the usual techniques, but I can’t figure out an easy, effective way to sharpen it. I have diamond plates etc but nothing narrow enough to grind/polish between the prongs.

    All suggestions welcomed!

    #25540
    Mark Armstrong
    Participant

    What you need is is diamond plate that will can over hang your bench top a little place bevel of blade on edge of plat at Desirered angle and use the post of blade on side of plate as this will help maintain angle move blade up and down edge.
    I am not the best at explaining this but I hope this helps.

    Dagenham, Essex, England

    #25550
    Greg Merritt
    Participant

    Some fine grain wet/dry sandpaper glued to a piece of wood would be quite effective as well, I would think.

    http://hillbillydaiku.com

    #25573
    nljsellers
    Participant

    Thanks Mark and Greg. Both options I hadn’t considered. I’ll let you know how I get on.

    #25574
    Juan-M
    Participant

    Here’s a person who sharpens like Greg says, with a block and sandpaper. It’s a good link to a video and some text:

    http://www.ncworkshops.com/sharpening_tips.html#sharpening

    #25577
    Greg Merritt
    Participant

    There is some good info there Juan. Thanks for the link.

    http://hillbillydaiku.com

    #25578
    Jay
    Participant

    I watched some spokeshave blade sharpening videos lately that were done length-wise… meaning the blade was sharpened back and forth along the length of the bevel.

    #26015
    Paul Sellers
    Participant

    Hi Nick,
    All good advice. EZE-Lap has sets and individual diamond files 1″ wide in all the grits. I use them for everything these days as they are so effective. Abrasive paper works well too. Here is the link for Chronos:

    http://www.ezelap.co.uk/tools/Diamond-Hone—Stone.html

    #26027
    David Gill
    Participant

    Hi Paul
    When using the !” diamond files for sharpening do you clamp the blade and move the file or clamp the file and move the blade?

    Wigan, Lancs. England :

    #26566
    nljsellers
    Participant

    Sorry I’ve been absent so long – I’ve only just got on to doing this. I used both Mark and Greg’s suggestions. An oilstone I have provided a coarse grit start. It’s a bit wider than the blade opening but I was able to use the corner to get started. I then moved to the abrasive paper suggested by Greg – i cut a piece of beech to create a piece a little narrower than the blade and about 6″ long. To this I glued pieces of 400, 1000 and 2000 grit paper. After this sharpening was easy. Thanks!

    I think I’ll be investing in Paul’s recommended EZE-Lap 1″ wide sets for the long term. Sounds like a permanent solution. Thanks Paul.

    #26575
    Greg Merritt
    Participant

    Glad you were able to get your spokeshave sharpened. The EZE-Lap set is the best long term solution for sure.

    http://hillbillydaiku.com

    #27859
    Ian Stewart
    Participant

    Hmmm. I’ve never felt comfortable using diamond plates, not that I’ve much experience of them and certainly not the expensive ones. I sharpen my spokeshaves by turning my oilstone on it’s side, and using the narrow face. This also raises the surface above the bench sufficiently for the tangs to hang down each side.
    Of course, this is no help if you don’t have old-fashioned oilstones.

    Since I’ve recently been learning sharpening along the bevel for curved blades, like my gouges and my hook knife, I don’t see why that wouldn’t work for a spokeshave blade. Maybe the tangs would get in the way of achieving the correct angle though?

    #28664
    nljsellers
    Participant

    Thanks, Ian, that’s a great suggestion. I do have an oilstone but it’s one of the two-sided ones with coarse and fine grit on either side. The side is where the two meet so it may not be suitable.

    I’m going to go take a look at that, thanks.

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