Woodworking Basics — How to Use a Sector

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  • #9015
    Ken
    Participant

    This is a new one for me, I would not use it my self, but its still interesting

    #9036
    STEVE MASSIE
    Participant

    Thanks Ken for the video, I have seen this demonstrated by Chris S. before.  He actually is pretty much a Hand Tool junkie if you will and I find him interesting, I do like his style. He is an entertainer to make things interesting. I like his writing style as well and if you have not read his books I think you would enjoy them.  I am glad he still contributes to Polar Woodworking which is one of my favorite Mags.

     

    Steve

    Steve Massie, I live in the great State of Florida, US

    #9038
    STEVE MASSIE
    Participant

    Correction Poplar Woodworking, fat fingers I apologize.

     

    Steve

    Steve Massie, I live in the great State of Florida, US

    #9041
    Dave
    Participant

    This is interesting, I’m guessing this dates back centuries.

    -Canada

    #9043
    Gary Hodgin
    Participant

    Interesting, never seen one of those. Not something I plan to make but I’m sure it’d be useful for a lot of things.

    #9049
    kelly
    Participant

    That’s cool!  I want to use one.  I need to find a reason.  🙂

    Texas, USA

    #9225
    Scott
    Participant

    There was a discussion thread about sectors a while back on a forum (cannot remember which one), and although the verbal explanation eluded my grasp at the time, there was mention that some old folding rules have lines that radiate out from the center pivot (hinge), allowing them to be used as sectors.

    Here is another video by Chris S. showing how he converts a crappy 4-fold folding rule into smaller sector. Same idea as the big boy.

    Make a Sector From a Crappy Folding Rule

    -Scott Los Angeles

    #9226
    kelly
    Participant

    I like that idea but …I don’t know if I could do that to an old tool, even if the old tool wasn’t in pristine condition.  It jus’ don’t seem right.  I think I’d just make it from scratch.

    Texas, USA

    #9236
    Ken
    Participant

    It must be catching on again. They are now selling these

     
    The scale of chords and circumferences is a modern descendant of the sector rule and is used in conjunction with a pair of dividers.

    The main use of the scale of chords is to convert a numeric angle into a physical one and vice-versa. The hinged rule is set by spanning the desired numeric angle on the scale of chords and then laying the points of the dividers into two punch marks on the rule. To measure a physical angle you simply use the same process in reverse.

    On the back of the rule is a scale of circumferences, which in conjunction with the standard metric scale, quickly transposes the diameter of a circle to give its circumference. Very useful when calculating material requirements for projects.

    Standard at 20 degrees C

    Stainless Steel

    Etched Markings

    Made in England

     

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