3 drawer hutch design

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  • #664568
    Bryan Barrick
    Participant

    I’m getting ready for my biggest project to date.
    I’ve designed this 3 drawer hutch. Its drawn to 1/8 scale the dividers are 7/8 thick. I like having all the dividers this thickness but I dont think it will work where the horizontal and vertical come together because it’s not thick enough to accommodate mortice and tenon from both sides . Only solution I can come up with is making the verticle dividers basically 2 inches thick to accommodate mortice and tenon from both sides. Any suggestions would be appreciated. Thanks!

    Attachments:
    #664629
    Larry Geib
    Participant

    If you are talking about the construction of the carcase itself and not the doors, Normal construction would be with housing joints ( Dado) and not mortise and tenon..

    A somewhat stronger variant would be the sliding dovetail , tapered sliding dovetail, or stopped and tapered sliding dovetail if you don’t want the construction to show.

    All these need not be deeper than say, 1/4” and would work just fine with 7/8” verticals.

    Paul introduces the joint here:
    https://paulsellers.com/2015/05/sliding-dovetails-slip-perfectly-in-place/

    The dovetail can be on one or both sides of a board. Both work fine.

    #664646
    Benoît Van Noten
    Participant

    I would make the vertical dividers as stiles.
    There is no need to have separate lower compartments inside, although it can be done with panels in a groove in the stiles.
    This allow the horizontal divider under the drawers to be made in one piece.
    The liaison with the two vertical stiles being done from the back with two notches coming in one another (halved joints)

    #664685
    Sven-Olof Jansson
    Participant

    Hej Bryan,

    A few thoughts from my own – failure rich – experience of making frame and panel carcasses; in particular on joining a horizontal face to a vertical one (end of of one meets the face of the other). As, hopefully, the attached drawing (“End to Face”) points to, it can become tight for space.

    A half-blind dovetail joint might perhaps be an alternative for connecting the top rail of the lower carcass to the sides. It’s a traditional one for table front rails. It doesn’t have to be full-depth, which usually greatly reduces the risk of the pin intruding on the mortice for the side rail. It’s helpful for assembly as well, but that might just be for me, who successfully managed to cross Regent’s Street twice on the way from Piccadilly to Charing Cross Road (albeit after lunch at F&M).

    Completely agree with Larry on the [stopped] sliding dovetails for the lower drawer rail. Trying to force one joint once resulted in the whole pin part spelching, but otherwise I’ve been fine without tapering the joint. Mortices and tenons to join end to face in 3/4″ or 7/8″ have been a challenge. Those short and shallow mortices often end with quite bruised short edges after having removed the waste.

    Would lap joints be an alternative for jointing the stiles to the lower drawer frame rail?

    Very happy to follow your progress.

    Sven-Olof Jansson
    London, UK; Boston, MA

    Attachments:
    #664984
    Bryan Barrick
    Participant

    If you are talking about the construction of the carcase itself and not the doors, Normal construction would be with housing joints ( Dado) and not mortise and tenon..

    A somewhat stronger variant would be the sliding dovetail , tapered sliding dovetail, or stopped and tapered sliding dovetail if you don’t want the construction to show.

    All these need not be deeper than say, 1/4” and would work just fine with 7/8” verticals.

    Paul introduces the joint here:
    https://paulsellers.com/2015/05/sliding-dovetails-slip-perfectly-in-place/

    The dovetail can be on one or both sides of a board. Both work fine.

    Thanks everyone for the help!

    #665045
    Benoît Van Noten
    Participant

    “Normal construction would be with housing joints ( Dado) and not mortise and tenon..”
    This is (US?) cultural.
    Where I live frame and panel is “normal”

    #665490
    Bryan Barrick
    Participant

    Hej Bryan,

    A few thoughts from my own – failure rich – experience of making frame and panel carcasses; in particular on joining a horizontal face to a vertical one (end of of one meets the face of the other). As, hopefully, the attached drawing (“End to Face”) points to, it can become tight for space.

    A half-blind dovetail joint might perhaps be an alternative for connecting the top rail of the lower carcass to the sides. It’s a traditional one for table front rails. It doesn’t have to be full-depth, which usually greatly reduces the risk of the pin intruding on the mortice for the side rail. It’s helpful for assembly as well, but that might just be for me, who successfully managed to cross Regent’s Street twice on the way from Piccadilly to Charing Cross Road (albeit after lunch at F&M).

    Completely agree with Larry on the [stopped] sliding dovetails for the lower drawer rail. Trying to force one joint once resulted in the whole pin part spelching, but otherwise I’ve been fine without tapering the joint. Mortices and tenons to join end to face in 3/4″ or 7/8″ have been a challenge. Those short and shallow mortices often end with quite bruised short edges after having removed the waste.

    Would lap joints be an alternative for jointing the stiles to the lower drawer frame rail?

    Very happy to follow your progress.

    The skidding dovetail guide looks interesting.
    I would love to see how it’s made and used.
    I’m just guessing it’s used with a chisel and you pair until it flush. Never seen it before.

    #665856
    Sven-Olof Jansson
    Participant

    Thanks for asking Bryan.

    (If you have access to a bandsaw or table saw, then all that’s needed is to set the blade to the desired angle, rip away, and finish with a few strokes with a bench plane.)

    I set a sliding bevel to the angle of my dovetail guide (1:7), then gauged a line some 3/8″ (10 mm, actually) in, along the side of the guide to be. From the ends of the gauge line, I used the sliding bevel to mark across the short edges, to finally connect those marks as they camo out on the other face with a gauge line.

    Knowing me, I ripped the piece, staying an approximate 1/16″ away from the gauge lines, to get an approximate bevel that I could then plane down – with very frequent controls of the angle and the gauge lines. The magnets were secured with glue in drilled holes.

    As used in the photo above, I just put the edge of the piece flush with the guide, paired in from the side using a chisel bevel up and resting on the guide, and touched up coming in from the edge. That gave the bevel a depth of 2 mm, which corresponded to the bevel of the “pin” part.

    Hopefully, the attached photos explain the two other uses of the guide. (Start the pins by drilling at the stopped end)

    Sven-Olof Jansson
    London, UK; Boston, MA

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