Welcome! Forums Project Series Bench Stool Bench Stool Progress

Viewing 15 posts - 61 through 75 (of 79 total)
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  • #25804
    Greg Merritt
    Participant

    It is possible to clean the brush, but you will have to be very quick. Milk paint dries very fast and hard. By the time I was done painting the stool the paint had started to dry in the base of the brush.

    http://hillbillydaiku.com

    #25808
    Greg Merritt
    Participant

    Ok, here is the finished product. The photos show the progression from raw wood to complete. Here is a list of the steps.
    1. sanded to 220 grit
    2. milk paint
    3. burnished with steel wool
    4. three coats of clear shellac
    5. rubbed out with steel wool
    6. paste wax applied

    Like I’ve said in other posts, if you try milk paint don’t panic when the paint dries flat and rough. I have got consistent results with the above steps. The completed finish always has good color and is very smooth.

    http://hillbillydaiku.com

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    #25813
    David R.
    Participant

    Greg,

    thank you for the description and photos. Looks promising and I like the green hue. I am eager to try the blue milk paint I got, but still have to make a project to go with it, the cane and cutting board weren’t particularly suitable.

    David

    from Germany

    #25822
    Jason
    Participant

    @gman3555, that’s the same process I just finished with my table base, but I had to use 3 coats of latex paint. If milk paint does it in 1 coat, it sounds like a win to me.

    Did you use the milk paint as a stain for your cherry table base or was it thick?

    Thanks!

    #25824
    Greg Merritt
    Participant

    @jason , I mixed the milk paint very thin and used it just like a stain for the cherry table. The whole process is just trial and error for me. But so far so good.

    http://hillbillydaiku.com

    #25894
    david o’sullivan
    Participant

    well done Greg looks super

    "we can learn what to do, by doing" Aristotle

    #25896
    Greg Merritt
    Participant

    Thanks David.

    http://hillbillydaiku.com

    #25993
    Florian
    Participant

    That’s a good looking stool. Interesting that you put shellac and wax on the milk paint. For a reason or just out of good habit?

    I enjoy working wood in Germany.

    #25996
    David R.
    Participant

    Florian,

    my guess is the milk paint itself is rather dull and brittle, so the shellac gives a polished surface and offers protection. Correct me if I’m wrong.

    David

    from Germany

    #26002
    Greg Merritt
    Participant

    Thanks Florian…David R. you are correct…I addressed the issue of top coating in an earlier post in this thread….
    “Milk paint also offers no real surface protection and must be top coated. Shellac and tung oil seem to be the most popular.”
    Milk paint, when dry, is very porous. Top coating just adds a layer of protection and makes it easier to clean.

    http://hillbillydaiku.com

    #26005
    John Moore
    Participant

    Greg, your stool turn out amazing. Thanks again for sharing your process. The milk paint is something I have been wanting to try. The colors and richness from the shellac/wax you show on your project rocks. I normally am not in a rush and could easily do a three day routine for a great finish.

    Lakeland, Florida USA

    #26014
    Greg Merritt
    Participant

    Thanks for the kind words John. It may just be beginners luck, but milk paint has given me very consistent results so far. Easy to use, hard to screw up and easy to fix if you do.

    http://hillbillydaiku.com

    #26044
    Florian
    Participant

    I think I’ll try to mix my own. We have a store with great earth color pigments in my neighbourhood and the imported milk paint from the US seems quite expensive over here.

    I enjoy working wood in Germany.

    #26045
    Greg Merritt
    Participant

    Florian…that sounds interesting. I know there are several recipes on-line for making your own.
    Did you try this site for purchase?
    http://www.american-heritage.de/milk-paint.html

    http://hillbillydaiku.com

    #26046
    Florian
    Participant

    No, thanks for the link! It was a different site and the milk paint was more expensive than on the one you linked above. I’ll try one of the recipes and have a look if it works. If not I’ll order some online. For me it’s a question of the prize, too. With shellac for example I pay less than a third by mixing my own and it’s just putting some flakes in alkohol and waiting for 24 hours.

    I enjoy working wood in Germany.

Viewing 15 posts - 61 through 75 (of 79 total)
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