Book projects

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 68 total)
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  • #4686
    juryaan
    Participant

    I have started on the projects in Paul’s book and just finished the first project

    the spatula.

    Now i would like to know what the best finish is for kitchen tools.

    Lopik - Netherlands

    #4689
    Dave
    Participant

    Olive oil or vegetable oil Is what I use on my cutting boards.  Its cheap and you probably already have at home 🙂

    Here’s a cutting board I made for a xmas present finished with olive oil.

     

     

    -Canada

    #4691
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    juryaan ,

    This is what I found, I hope it helps……..

    Wooden boards should never be placed in the dishwasher, or left immersed for long periods, as the wood or glue may be affected.
    A light food-grade mineral oil is a good preservative for wooden cutting boards, as it helps keep water from seeping into the grain. Alternatively, one may also use a food-grade drying oil such aspoppyseed oiltung oil or linseed oil. The first two dry much faster than linseed. Note that most commercially available linseed and tung oils are not “food grade”, as they contain metallic driers. In general, edible savory vegetable or olive oils are not recommended because they tend to go rancid, causing the board to smell and your food to pick up the rancid taste.
    To prevent cracking, cutting boards should be treated when they start looking dry. A standard recommendation is 5-7 times a year, or as needed.

    #4692
    juryaan
    Participant

    Thank you Ken,

    very helpful information.

     

    Lopik - Netherlands

    #4694
    constable415
    Participant

    I hope there is still going to be a third part to working wood.  🙂

    #4695
    Brent Ingvardsen
    Participant

    Nice work Juryaan !

    Meridianville, Alabama, USA

    #4712
    kelly
    Participant

    I’m glad the topic of the food utensils has come up.  I’ve been wondering if there is a type of wood that should be used for items that will be holding or touching our food.  Or should the question be, is there a type of wood that should *_NOT_* be used to make these items?

    Texas, USA

    #4713
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    Usually any pale wood is good for food use. Sycamore, Beech, Maple, Hornbeam and Ash (although a little open grained) are all good for this. Wood such as Oak with a high Tannin content can stain and turn black after contact with some foods.

    #4778
    Redtail
    Participant

    I have also heard of using walnut oil which can be found in health food stores Juryaan.

    West Virginia, USA

    #4781
    Greg Merritt
    Participant

    I used walnut oil on mine.  They have been hand washed several times and seem to be holding up just fine.

    http://hillbillydaiku.com

    #4802
    juryaan
    Participant

    I went with Kevin and Gregory and used the walnut oil.

    Really love the color,thanks guys.

     

    Lopik - Netherlands

    #4809
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    Nice one buddy I’m pleased you have it sorted. The spatula looks great 🙂

    #4810
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    Gregory, nice job they look great buddy 😉

    #4812
    George Bridgeman
    Participant

    I also used walnut oil on my spoon, which I carved in ash. It came up really nicely.

    George.

    "To know and not do is to not know"

    #4814
    Brent Ingvardsen
    Participant

    Was a template for the spatula included within the book? I noticed others but not one for the spatula.

    Meridianville, Alabama, USA

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