Book projects

Viewing 15 posts - 46 through 60 (of 68 total)
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  • #5969
    kelly
    Participant

    Thanks for the encouragement Ken!  You might be right.

    I’m not making excuses but, my vise (that I just finished making yesterday) also needs some work.  It needs better handles.  I wasn’t able to tighten it down enough.  So, the work piece kept sliding in the vise as I tried to saw it.  …yeah, that’s the ticket!  🙂

     

    Texas, USA

    #5973
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    Kelly,

    I have the same problem buddy, till I get my bench finished and a vise fitted. I found a bit of non slip  router mat, or drawer liner helps for now.

    #6133
    Ron Harper
    Participant

    I know that this flies in the face of what a lot of folks believe, but it can help to plane an almost imperceptible crown in the center of your wooden vise jaws.

    #6137
    juryaan
    Participant

    imperceptible crown[/quote

    Hello Ron,what does this mean,a hollow in your vice?

    Sorry if this seems a stupid question,but i am Dutch and don’t know every English woodworking term yet.

     

    Lopik - Netherlands

    #6187
    Sinisa
    Participant

    Hi guys,
    this is not exactly book project but it is mostly based on wall shelf project from the book. It is ready for finish, probably couple hands of shellac and then my wife wants to paint it

    Living in Croatia

    #6189
    kelly
    Participant

    @sinisa, nice application of your new skills.  Good work.

    Texas, USA

    #6194
    Ron Harper
    Participant

    Juryaan

    the exact opposite of a hollow and very very slight

    #6201
    Mexiquite
    Participant

    Here is the pine shelf I made with Paul at Penryhn Castle. I distressed it a bit and quite like the look of it.

    #6203
    kelly
    Participant

    @Mexiquite, that looks good.  Is the wood thicker than what is typically used?

    Texas, USA

    #6213
    juryaan
    Participant

    Juryaan the exact opposite of a hollow and very very slight

    thank you for explaning Ron.

    Looks great Mexiquite,must have been awesome working with Paul.

    Hope that someday he will come to Holland for some courses.

    Lopik - Netherlands

    #6291
    Mexiquite
    Participant

    @Kelly Scroggins It’s regular pine stock. @Juryaan It was fantastic working with Paul. I’ve taken 1 2 3 levels, the sharpening class and then the month long one. I’ll take anything he’ll offer.

    #6378
    mcglynnonmaking
    Participant

    I’ve made several of the projects from the book.  I have to say, they have all been fun and very instructional.

    The 3-legged stool isn’t finished yet, I have some more fine tuning on the parts before I glue and finish it.  I’ve made two of the candle boxes, one in Canary Pine and one in Cherry.  These are a lot of fun to do.  It helped my with my dovetail technique, and also with laying out and cutting hinge mortises.

    I’m thinking I’ll make the bookcase with my 12 year old son for his room, maybe starting this weekend.  I’ve been documenting the step-by-step on these on my blog

    #6383
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    Nice work Joe, and a great blog

    #6390
    juryaan
    Participant

    Everything is looking great Joe,love the bowl.

    Lopik - Netherlands

    #6393
    mcglynnonmaking
    Participant

    Thanks guys.

    If anyone hasn’t made a few projects from the book I’d strongly recommend it.  None of them require a huge investment in tools of lumber, they are fun to make and very instructional in technique.

    My brother-in-law is a DIY kind of guy, although not a woodworker by any stretch.  I gave him Paul’s book for Christmas.  I knew I liked the book, but before I bought it for him I looked at several other books in the same category:  “New Traditional Woodworker” by Jim Tolpin, “Made by Hand” by Tom Figden and a few others that escape me at the moment.  They are all wonderful books, but Paul’s has the best combination of basic information about wood and necessary tools, interesting but approachable projects, and in-depth information on sharpening.  If one works through the projects in the book I think you’ll have the basic skills to take on much more advanced/complex projects.

Viewing 15 posts - 46 through 60 (of 68 total)
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