Craftsman 506-51890 bench vice – how to remove dog?

Welcome! Forums General Woodworking Discussions Tools and Tool Maintenance/Restoration Craftsman 506-51890 bench vice – how to remove dog?

This topic contains 9 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by  Dave Ring 8 months, 2 weeks ago.

Viewing 10 posts - 1 through 10 (of 10 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #553597

    GfB
    Participant

    This vice was passed down to me from my grandfather. A bit rusty, but appears in good shape. Even has original wooden handle in good condition.

    I would like to remove the dog assembly before I begin the cleanup process. I can’t tell if it’s just being stubborn, but I can’t get the little nub/handle to unscrew. Is it permanently attached?

    Attachments:
    #553604

    Ed
    Participant

    @awesomeopossum74 you made me curious, so I searched for the model number and found this:

    http://michael-parrish.com/2016/06/08/craftsman-506-51890-woodworkers-vise-restoration/

    Notice the detailed part diagram.

    #553605

    GfB
    Participant

    @ed, Yes sir, I saw that before. Unfortunately, the diagram doesn’t show how the peg is inserted, and his excellent tutorial doesn’t talk about it, because his was replaced by previous owner.

    I want to remove mine for cleaning, so nondestructive removal is necessary. I’ve hit it with penetrator, so I’ll see if that helps.

    #553606

    Ed
    Participant
    #553617

    Dave Ring
    Participant

    I have the nearly identical Japanese made version of this vise and, as far as I can tell, the handle/pin is press fit into the dog. You might be able to get it out using visegrips and brute force but you might not get it solidly back together.

    I think you’d be better off leaving the dog in place. FWIW my vise was painted at the factory with the dog fully assembled.

    BTW your vise was made by Columbian.

    Dave

    #553618

    markh
    Participant

    If you could get the wooden handle off safely, you could try heating the main handle casting and trying to keep the pin cool. A bit of differential heating sometimes helps to loosen tapered pins and break oxides holding them together. However, bear in mind that I don’t know if there are any other parts that could be harmed though – think it through before you apply the torch.

    Cheers
    Mark

    #553622

    Ed
    Participant

    @awesomeopossum74 sorry I was cryptic in my reply. The lumberjocks link has the answer from someone who took one apart. It is a press fit. From that link, “…I did get the pin out. It is not threaded, just a tapered friction fit. A puller would be useful. We just used a whole lot of force, pry bars, tapping etc.” There’s not much more in the link.

    #553623

    GfB
    Participant

    @ed, No problem; I appreciate your help! I read the post and understood. Along with @markh and @davering‘s comments, I’m concerned it’s a “destructive” method, I don’t know that I’d be able to reassemble it. 🙁

    I guess I’ll try pulling it out. If I can’t get it back in, I can always replace it with a wood peg for accent.

    @markh, Unfortunately, the wood handle is permanently installed. I’m betting the ends are glued on; there are no screws, and the caps themselves don’t appear to be threaded.

    #553638

    Dave Ring
    Participant

    I think that trying to remove the dog is a bad idea. I fail to see any real point to it and I do see the potential for damage.

    Dave

    #553640

    Dave Ring
    Participant

    On mine, one of the wooden handle caps is glued on. The other was just held on by friction, although I later added a screw to that end.

    Dave

Viewing 10 posts - 1 through 10 (of 10 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.