Eight Drawer Cabinet of Dubious Origin

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Viewing 9 posts - 16 through 24 (of 24 total)
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  • #14683
    elvishefer
    Participant

    Serhiy – I have some scrap wood spanning my bench on which I pile a lot of the wood I have. It gives an extra bonus of adding more weight to the bench, making it more stable. I also put some on top of two book cases and sometimes leave some piled in the hallway. I bribe my girlfriend into letting me do so by making her as many things as I can. 😉

    The bench pile:

    Wood under my work bench.

    The drill press is a bench top model and runs relatively quiet, making it a great alternative to hammering mortises and it keeps the neighbors from complaining. relatively cheap from HD, too. Hopefully we’ll be moving to a house soon and I’ll have more space.

    David – I have two shop assistants, both Bengals. The one pictured is usually very well behaved and will hang out while I work. Her sister will attack the sharp edge of a chisel, so I have to keep my eye on her at all times. I usually appreciate the company though; they make quite tolerable supervisors.

    Cat two, drawer inspector:

    Drawer inspecting cat.

    Halifax, Canada

    #15084
    orkaniusz
    Participant

    Great job, Jeremy! I admire your patience. The whole story is an inspiration for me.
    I see that you have used the Stanley’s saw for rip cut. Could you write me what is the model and do you recommend it to cut pine along?

    #15085
    elvishefer
    Participant

    Hi Piotr,

    The model of saw is Stanley Fat Max 20-047 (20 inch, 9 tpi)

    It is $30 before tax here in Canada.

    Good:

    • It did the job
    • Did not bind
    • Cleared sawdust reasonably well on the rips, but the boards were only 3 3/4 inches wide
    • Works great for plywood, reasonable at cross-cutting, etc. so it’s not a one-trick pony

    Bad:

    • It’s not a dedicated rip saw, and I feel confident that a proper 9 tpi rip would out-perform it
    • Thick kerf
    • Cannot be sharpened (it’s disposable)

    It should be ok for pine but will require some patience.

    Good luck!

    Halifax, Canada

    #121977
    mauipapa
    Participant

    I really, really, like this chest. It may have neen a lot of work, but I think it’s something to be proud of.

    #122019
    David Gill
    Participant

    Great achievement converting a stack of 4″ x 2″ offcuts into a fine cabinet You should be very satisfied

    Wigan, Lancs. England :

    #122020
    Matt McGrane
    Participant

    Love the project, elvishefer. I’m another fan of using home center or recycled wood. Probably because I’m such a cheap-wad. Great work.

    Matt, Northern California - Started a blog in 2016: http://tinyshopww.blogspot.com/

    #122024
    David R.
    Participant

    Wonderful project, I really like how it turned out. Lots of work, lots of experience gained and made something useful and lasting from mostly cut offs. Congratulations.

    from Germany

    #122195
    elvishefer
    Participant

    Thanks for the kind words everyone!

    The cabinet is still holding up… The wood may not be the best but the joinery techniques are solid (thanks Paul Sellers).

    Happy Holidays,
    Jeremy

    Halifax, Canada

    #122196
    Frank Joseph
    Participant

    SWMBO is correct it is too nice for the shop
    Very nice it shows what good training can do along with good application.
    Frankj

    In South Jersey the good part of New Jersey, USA.

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