Welcome! Forums General Woodworking Discussions Woodworking Videos Influence of chipbreaker on tearout (Kawai & Kato with verified subtitles)

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  • #310908
    kodi
    Participant

    I am pretty sure most of you have seen this video, but I couldn’t find a link on this forum. So for anyone that didn’t see it. In Japan, Professor Yasunori Kawai and Honorary Professor Chutaro Kato at Yamagata University did a research in the role of chipbreaker. Part of this research was this video (now with verified English Subtitles).
    Link to the page with video

    • This topic was modified 3 years, 3 months ago by kodi.
    #322426
    Misha
    Participant

    I saw this video about a year ago and it made me readjust most of my chipbreakers. It works really great.
    It does help to plane against the grain.

    Misha

    #330755
    Harold Blair
    Participant

    This is awesome! When working with heavily figured wood (tiger maple, etc.) this could be a huge advantage. Anyone have specifics on the best way to modify the chipbreakers?
    Harold

    #332769
    Misha
    Participant

    I sharpened the chipbreakers at 70-80 degrees and set them about half a millimeter to the edge of the cutting iron. It works great. But you will have to get used to increased resistance.
    I will post some photos a bit later.

    Misha

    #332795
    Misha
    Participant

    Reshaping and setting

    Misha

    Attachments:
    #332805
    Misha
    Participant

    Before, after and appearance of the shavings the plane may produce.

    Misha

    Attachments:
    #482891
    jakegevorgian
    Participant

    Basically, what happens with the chip breaker being hair close to the cutting edge is that when the cutter is about to go against the grain, the minimal cutting edge caused by the closeness of the chip breaker minimizes the tear out to almost none. This is mostly good for smoothing, but intial roughing may be difficult with this set up.

    #482935
    Misha
    Participant

    Yes, I do agree that the resistance is a bit greater, but on the whole it helps a lot. I have been using this method for more than a year and is not planning to go back. This method gives me the possibility to plane in any direction. Certainly I do plane with the grain most of the time but I am not at all worried when there are difficult knots on the way or when the grain changes its direction once and again.
    Sometimes I set the chipbreaker rather close to the cutting edge and sometimes not that close. In general it is half a millimeter or a bit more.
    And I never set it less than half a millimeter. I found that in this case the shavings being to turn into washing boards and the surface is not as smooth as it should be.
    Good luck!

    Misha

    #482973
    jakegevorgian
    Participant

    Always good to have a few planes 🙂 I’ve a number 4 and a 5 set up this way. And it just finishes off pretty much all of my long pieces. Right now I’m working on a project—about 300board feet American walnut (over 200 years old) air dried stock. Can’t risk tear outs on that precious piece 😉 way to go Misha

    #483386
    Harvey Kimsey
    Participant

    I’ve recently been planing hard maple with a lot of figure in it. For the rough planing a scrub plane like Paul’s but with a finely set cutter works fine, planing across the grain and traversing the boards at 45 degrees. For the final smoothing, I took a Stanley #3 and honed a 10 degree back bevel on the iron, giving me the equivalent of a 55 degree angle of attack. This worked quite well but then I took out the cutter and stropped both the bevel and the back bevel extensively and the result was amazing. Set very fine, the plane takes a 1-1.5 inch wide shaving with no tear out. Another thing I found that helps is to strop/Polish the top edge of the chipbreaker so that fine shavings don’t stick to it.

    #483395
    Harvey Kimsey
    Participant

    I too have some Hock chipbreakers like that. They come with quite a sharp edge on them. I’ve started honing a blunt 70-80 degree bevel on them too. The shape of the old Stanley-style chipbreakers accomplishes the same thing. Thanks!

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