Making a polissior polisher

Welcome! Forums General Woodworking Discussions Finishing Making a polissior polisher

This topic contains 44 replies, has 12 voices, and was last updated by  Mark Armstrong 5 years, 3 months ago.

Viewing 15 posts - 31 through 45 (of 45 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #56935

    Sandy
    Participant

    Jay, if you want the tarred nylon you can get it at most leather craft stores. But they call it waxed nylon (I believe it’s the same thing.).

    Insanity: doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results.

    Albert Einstein

    #56936

    Jay
    Participant

    I wish we had a leather craft store around here somewhere. That did remind me that we have a Michael’s craft store that might be worth checking.

    #56964

    Mark Armstrong
    Participant

    I just ordered some bees wax even if I se it as a grain filler and polish Straw brooms quite rare in UK.
    I dare not order straw from any where end up with hundred weight lol.
    I wonder if a pet shop do straw?
    Furniture making so divers so many different skills needed can put your head in a spin.

    Dagenham, Essex, England

    #56971

    Greg Merritt
    Participant
    #56972

    Mark Armstrong
    Participant

    Cheers Greg 😉

    Dagenham, Essex, England

    #57373

    Jay
    Participant

    Here’s what I came up with. I found a smaller weight of paracord locally, so I used that. This is constrictor knots (Thanks to Greg for the instructions/diagrams) under a paracord “handle wrap”. I used another tutorial for that (link below) as I wasn’t quite ready to take on the turk’s head knots and this handle wrap was very easy. My mind just doesn’t seem to grasp knots too well, but it turned out fine. It’s a bit sloppy, but feels good in the hand and it is packed tight.

    I have some bee’s wax coming in the mail tomorrow and I will dip it and cut the ends… then should be ready to go. Thanks, Greg. Can’t wait to try it.

    http://www.natrevga.com/2013/07/how-to-wrap-handle-with-paracord.html

    Attachments:
    #57387

    Greg Merritt
    Participant

    Nice work Jay. Keep me posted on how well it works for you. Remember to grate or finely chop your bees wax before you try to melt it. Otherwise it will take you forever to get it melted down.

    http://hillbillydaiku.com

    #57388

    Jay
    Participant

    Thanks, Greg… I’ll let you know how it goes. I got some bee’s wax that comes in a bag of tiny pellets because you mentioned it is slow to melt… so I’m hoping the pellets melt quickly.

    #57404

    Sandy
    Participant

    Greg, I whipped one out of an old whisk broom and tried it on a couple of piecec. I just rubbed the bees wax on the surface and went at it. After a few strokes the polissior was coated well with wax and put on a really nice shine.

    Insanity: doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results.

    Albert Einstein

    #57418

    Greg Merritt
    Participant

    Awesome. It’s almost magical, isn’t it? Be careful it’s addictive. I have a whole stack if scrap with nice polished and waxed faces. I’m also working on a blog post about a few burnishers that will get into the nooks and crannies that polissoir can’t reach.

    http://hillbillydaiku.com

    #57446

    Jay
    Participant

    I got my beeswax today and melted it in a small crockpot that we never use (apparently, if you decide to do this you can’t use the pan or whatever you use for food again). It melted in about 20 minutes or so, and I dipped and cut both ends of the polisher (one side flat, one with beveled edges). After they were cut I went to dip the trimmed ends again, and like a big dummy I dropped the whole polisher into the hot beeswax. At first I was disappointed, but then decided it might be good to have the cord wrap sealed as well… at least I don’t think it will hurt anything.

    Anyway, I put it in the fridge to cool down for a bit then I’m going to test it out.

    #57451

    Jay
    Participant

    Here it is after the wax and trim.

    *edit* I just tried it out on a piece of pine and it does work well. Leaves a nice, smooth but natural feel to the wood. I did notice that the flat end of my polisher can dig in a bit if I put too much weight to one side and leave very light scratches in the surface of the wood… so I think I am going to put a bevel on that side as well.

    Attachments:
    #57456

    Greg Merritt
    Participant

    Very nice Jay. Yep, round the edges slightly and you will solve you “digging in” issue. It really needs to be broken in to produce optimal results. Use it on a bunch of scrap and you will see the difference.

    You did a good job.

    By the way, I melted my bees wax in a coffee cup when I did mine. SWMBO was not pleased. It took me a good hour to get that cup clean. 🙂

    http://hillbillydaiku.com

    #57486

    Jay
    Participant

    Heheh… I made sure to send a text to clear the crock pot for use before I dove in.

    Thanks though… I played with it more last night and noticed 2 things that I like.

    1. It makes the color of the grain pop out… a lot like a Danish oil finish.
    2. It even compresses the end grain pretty easily and smooths it out.

    #57489

    Mark Armstrong
    Participant

    I still want attempt this. Got bees wax but no broom. Been off work a fair bit lately so funds a little bit short.
    I’m not going to chance tea cup method. I might end up with a right hook. Lol

    Dagenham, Essex, England

Viewing 15 posts - 31 through 45 (of 45 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.