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Not a woodworking tool, but similar concept

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  • This topic has 12 replies, 8 voices, and was last updated 1 month ago by Alan.
Viewing 13 posts - 1 through 13 (of 13 total)
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  • #601292
    Brian A
    Participant

    Hi folks,

    A question for the tool people about cutting complicated fibers and, probably, dirt.

    My 20′ deep backyard abuts a 4 acre forest that was recently ‘slashed and burned’. The resulting invasive weeds (the super aggressive kind found in US zone 8b) at the margin of this erstwhile forest now encroach into the mulched beds around the expensive trees I had planted (by an average yet expensive landscaping company) one foot from the property line to screen out said destruction.

    I tried to cut a sort of barrier into the weeds down in the drainage ditch area, but they recently destroyed my ‘weed-eater’ string trimmer. Now, the weeds are completely surrounding the trees and are amassing for an assault on our house and grounds.

    I am contemplating an older and more mature tool, like a scythe or a sickle, to remove weeds without killing my trees, but I am concerned that the swing radius for these tools will be challenging in the confined 1′ space between the trees and the property line (I don’t want to kill my trees or get sued for chopping down things across the property line – though I am not averse to discreet chopping across the line as it is currently completely untended).

    Do any of ye have experience with or advice regarding such tools and/or landscaping nightmares?

    Best regards,

    Brian

    .

    #601319
    Craig
    Participant

    Brian,
    Two choices.
    Pull weeds up by the roots.
    Spray Roundup.
    Craig

    SW Pennsylvania

    #601772
    Dave Ring
    Participant

    I’d use a weed whip, also known as a grass whip or sling blade. Classic hand tool.

    Dave

    #602505
    Richard Crockford
    Participant

    If they’re really tough, try a mattock?

    #603559
    Brian A
    Participant

    [postquote quote=601772][/postquote]

    Mmm hmmm…aright then…I reckon I’ll go get one them Kaiser blades.
    (the lady in your video mowed down more in 20 seconds than the string trimmer did in 20 minutes)
    I used to have one, from a hardware store, with a tempered serrated steel blade, a bit flimsy. Maybe I can find an old one that can be sharpened.
    @Craig – tried those methods. Slowed the invaders down but didn’t stop them.
    @Richard – not mattock territory, at least on my side of the line, but plenty of invasive trees on the other side.

    .

    #603598
    Larry Geib
    Participant

    Get a Scythe. It’s been the most efficient hand tool for clearing a field for 4,000 years.

    You can take classes in sharpening and use, which usually involves clearing the host’s field, and you pay for the privilege.

    An if you dress like this people will give you a wide berth.

    Attachments:
    #603831
    Brian A
    Participant

    The space is a bit tight for a large mowing scythe (with new landscape trees as obstacles), and the weeds a mixture of woody stems and grass, but maybe a scythe with a ‘bush blade’ would work. Making the curved handle apparatus would certainly be an advanced woodworking project.

    .

    #603863
    Larry Geib
    Participant

    They will clear brush.

    Making the curved handle apparatus would certainly be an advanced woodworking project.

    …or an introductory steam bending project.
    One I had 40 years ago was hickory that was clearly steam bent. When I moved into town it went to somebody who could better make use of it. The ‘field’ at my current residence is about 10’x20’.
    As far as I know, the scythe is still being used.

    #611918
    Dave Hutchins
    Participant

    Have you tried a weed wacker with a circular saw blade? I rent one every few years because the briars on the unkept land that abutts our property start to take over parts of the yard that don’t get used much

    #612443
    Dave Ring
    Participant

    If the stuff is too thick for a weed whip, you could use a machete. (Kinda hard on the back, though.)

    Dave

    #614034
    Brian A
    Participant

    @Dave Hutchins – Have not tried the circular saw due to a combination of availability and some trepidation.

    @Dave Ring – A machete-like tool is basically what I’ve resorted to while pondering more elegant solutions.

    .

    #615407
    Flemming Aaberg
    Participant

    Looks like my bad day of golf

    #617568
    Alan
    Participant

    I find it difficult to take advice from that guy in the video who thinks its a good idea to take a hapless little toddler and his dog scything with him in the long grass.
    Idiot + Scythe = Lost legs.
    I’d give him a wide berth.

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